Agenda

Day 1 Virtual

9:00 – 9:30

Login and platform familiarisation

9:30 – 9:45

Welcome

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Tenetur suscipit iure non porro nulla saepe maxime atque voluptatum doloremque quibusdam quisquam, vero repudiandae delectus dolore aspernatur optio sapiente accusantium sit!

Jon Hunt
Executive Director, Research & Enterprise, University of Bristol, and Director of Conference Planning, ARMA UK

Jon joined the University of Bristol in February 2019 and is the Executive Director for Research & Enterprise, and Divisional Head for the Research & Enterprise Division (RED). RED helps academics to collaborate and access resources to augment research power, environment and impact – enhancing our national and international reputations and REF success.
Before joining Bristol, Jon has worked for the West of England Combined Authority (WECA), the University of Bath, the Royal Society, as a business analyst in a small company in London, and EPSRC. Before that he was a Chemist, researching liquid crystals.

Jennifer Johnson
Director, Research and Innovation Service, University of Northumbria, and Chair, ARMA UK

Jennifer is Director of Research and Innovation Services at Northumbria University with responsibility for a wide range of research strategy, policy and support services and was the Head of Research Operations and Head of Research Performance and Governance at the University of Leeds for 10 years. Jennifer is committed to the professionalisation and recognition of the research management and administration sector and has sat on the ARMA Board of Directors since 2016. Jennifer was ARMA Director of Training & Development before undertaking a year as Chair Elect and becoming Chair of the Association in August 2020.

9:45 – 10:30

Keynote: Resilience and connectivity, diversity and engagement: the UKRI Strategy 2022-2027 and the case for change

UKRI’s new strategy emphasises four principles for change: diversity, connectivity, resilience and engagement.
In this keynote, Professor Smith will reflect on these principles and what they mean:
- for UKRI as an organization and a funder;
- for the relationship between UKRI and ARMA;
- and for our global work.
The profound challenges of our time require a connected response, but our funding system is not well set for supporting this. Our universities are increasingly using their research strategically and with a focus on civic engagement – but funders struggle to keep up with the ambition. And short-term funding and perverse incentives lead us to tactical not strategic engagement.
This keynote will be an invitation to rethink our system, together.

Professor Christopher Smith
Executive Chair, Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), and International Champion, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)

Professor Christopher Smith is the Executive Chair of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and International Champion for UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). He has been Professor of Ancient History at the University of St Andrews since 2002, and he was also Dean of Arts (2002-2006), Dean of Graduate Studies (2006-2009), and Vice-Principal (2007-2009), before being seconded as Director of the British School at Rome, the UK’s leading humanities and creative arts research institute overseas, from 2009 to 2017.
From 2017 to 2020 he was a Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellow, with a project on The Roman Kings: A Study in Power. He held visiting positions in Erfurt, Princeton, Otago, Pavia, Milan, Siena, Aarhus and Paris Panthéon-Sorbonne.
Professor Smith’s research explores constitutionalism and state formation with a particular emphasis on the development of Rome as a political and social community, using archaeological, historical and anthropological approaches. He is the author or editor of over 20 books from textual editions to museum studies. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries Scotland, the Royal Historical Society, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Royal Society of Arts and a Member of the Academia Europaea.

10:45 – 11:30

Challenging the status quo? Collaboration, Communication and Facilitation in the New Normal

Over the past two years, both academic and non-academic publications have argued that working culture has changed permanently following the global response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The media has proclaimed it as “the end of work as we know it” (Financial Times, 05 April 2022) and that these changes have become “the new normal” (Forbes, 17 February 2021). As people return to the workplace, can we still say that the pandemic has actually revolutionised our working practices?
This interactive session explores how working with academic colleagues and professional services teams have evolved as the result of an extended period of remote working. The aim of the session is to identify best practices and potential opportunities by sharing local knowledge and experiences based on the following themes:
Collaboration (technical advancement, flexibility, networking opportunities)
Communication (online, off-line, hybrid, addressing and interacting with audience)
Facilitation (relationships, process, training delivery, professional development)
The session will be delivered by Research Facilitators working in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, but colleagues from across disciplines are very welcome. Following the session, we will invite participants to collaborate on a collection of best – and worst – practices with an aim of producing a short, co-authored article for online publication.

Elizabeth Penner
Research Facilitator, University of Cambridge

As Research Facilitator, I support researchers applying for funding through European and International organisations. My role involves running training sessions, discussing funding opportunities with individuals and groups, providing feedback on grant applications, coordinating peer-review and mock interview panels, and keeping up to date on the wider research funding landscape. My background is in Art History and English Literature and I received my PhD from De Montfort University in 2016 for my research on gender and national identity in the Boy's Own Paper. Before that, I studied 20th Century Literature and Art History at the University of Sussex.

Anna Cieslik
Research Facilitator, University of Cambridge

Anna received PhD in Human Geography from Clark University. After several years as a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute in Göttingen and as an assistant professor at New Jersey City University, she started working in research support. Anna is a Research Facilitator for Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. She is involved in analyzing funding trends and in horizon scanning for funding opportunities. She provides advice and feedback on grant applications. Anna enjoys teaching in a variety of settings, running workshops and training sessions, and helping researchers develop their projects. Her academic background is in migration and urban studies.

Andrea Salter
AHSS REF Manager and Research Facilitator, University of Cambridge

Working across the Schools of Arts and Humanities and the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Cambridge, Andrea designed, managed and coordinates administration in preparation for REF 2021. She also supports large, complex international research funding applications, working with research leaders to develop their ideas, network across disciplines internationally and to support the University's research strategies. Andrea is an experienced social researcher, specialising in archival, cultural and social research and continues to publish around her interests in women's social histories, methodologies and the use of documents of life in sociological analysis.

Allison Ksiazkiewicz
Research Support Administrator, University of Cambridge

As Research Support Administrator, Allison assists in strategic initiatives that enhances support for funding opportunities. She provides feedback on funding applications, coordinate funding communications and generate reports for analysing funding. Before arriving in the UK for graduate and post-graduate degrees in History and Philosophy of Science, Allison studied History of Art and Fine Arts (studio) in Canada. After postdoctoral work at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (Berlin) and the Paul Mellon Centre (London), she began working in grants support administration and continue to remain active in Cambridge’s local arts community.

Working together to deliver research grants in challenging times

Session objectives:
To deliver an interactive session using examples and learning from our own experience of set up a complex, international project remotely during the Covid pandemic.
To demonstrate a range of flexible and responsive project management tools in a research context.
To help participants to apply the tools to their own practice, whether team activities or project support.

Content:

We will:

  • Describe a major interdisciplinary, international research project led by Brunel
  • Outline agile approaches to project delivery, and how it differs from traditional project management approaches
  • Explore the reasons for using this approach to manage the project including management of risk, improving communication, gaining a shared understanding of objectives and increasing visibility of the work to be done
  • Demonstrate how the process gave us reassurance, clarity, cohesion, visibility, regular touch points to ensure progress and early identification of issues of concern
  • Share two tools for use by participants in their daily work
  • Describe how we are beginning to share agile approaches with researchers to explore its use when undertaking research itself

Benefit to delegates:

  • Knowledge and practical experience of two tools to take away
  • Understanding of the principles of scrum agile
  • Value of scrum agile in delivery of research.
Ushma Gudka
Head of Post Award, Brunel University London

Ushma Gudka is Head of Post Award focusing on bringing together support for funded research grants to achieve successful delivery.

Sarah Willcox
Director, Fairisle Projects and Change

Sarah Willcox is Director of Fairisle, a change consultancy helping teams deliver better together.

Four Approaches to Supporting Equitable Research Partnerships with Low- and Middle- Income Country Stakeholders

The UK Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR) and ESSENCE on Health, supported by a group of international research funders, have created a Good Practice Document on supporting Equitable Research Partnerships with recommendations for funders and HEIs. This session will explore how the document’s recommendations apply to the research management community, to support uptake at the institutional and academic level. Power and funding dynamics create challenges to realising equitable research partnerships between the UK and Low- and Middle- Income Country (LMIC) partners, in recent years UK HEIs have taken on more responsibility in addressing the challenges with attaining equitable research partnerships.
Recognising the crucial role for research management in this space, this parallel session explores how this Good Practice Document can support the research management community to create an enabling environment for equitable partnerships; build the capacity of research management within LMICs; drive long-term institutional partnerships between UK and LMIC HEIs; and instigate changes in the terms of research partnerships including governance, contracting, and intellectual property. Facilitated discussion will provide delegates with an understanding of how to support equitable partnerships within the UK research context, currently characterised by uncertainty around future ODA funding streams and concerns around research security.

Alice Chadwick El-Ali
Senior Research and Policy Officer, The UK Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR)

Alice joined UKCDR as Senior Research and Policy Officer in November 2021. She leads UKCDR's work on research enablers for development impact, including equitable partnerships and research capacity strengthening. Alice recently completed a doctorate in development studies at the University of Bath exploring the development industry and how it interacts with ideas about employment and citizenship in Sierra Leone. Alice’s experience is in translating research findings into policy and practice through working in partnership with civil society and government stakeholders. She has conducted research and evaluations for international development organisations including VSO and Restless Development.

Eva Kagiri-Kalanzi
Programme Manager, ARMA UK

Eva is an international development specialist with years of experience working within the private, public and third sectors. She joined ARMA in 2019 where she works as a programme manager, managing projects such as ReMPro, an initiative of the African Academy of Sciences in which ARMA is an implementing partner. Eva is also responsible for planning, implementing ARMA's training and development, managing the RLUK-AHRC research catalyst programme, and the most recently Research England funded project on Trusted Research.

Research Compliance legislation and HEIs – working with academics towards a shared goal

The aim of our presentation will be to illustrate how we process legislation and rules that can be complex and confusing for research academics, by taking the approach that whilst it is our role rather than theirs to know the detail around legal issues relating to research compliance, we rely on their knowledge to recognise where to flag concerns.
We will illustrate problems that research academics have faced with previous processes, being only a vague knowledge of rules and regulations, a general lack of awareness of bureaucratic and legal matters that impact research work, and how that has changed since the Research Compliance team was created. We will detail work we have done to create policy and process documents around key compliance issues, and the steps taken to build external relationships to promote sharing knowledge, best practice, and experience.
We will discuss the advantages arising from having a central compliance function and how to best share valuable information with research academics in an efficient and digestible manner, ensuring face time with academics for approachability, visibility, profile but also so they can be assured we all work towards a shared goal, promoting a collaborative approach to problem solving.

Chaitali Desai
Research Compliance Manager, University of Bristol

Chaitali Desai is the Research Compliance Manager at the University of Bristol. She is responsible for ensuring understanding and application of legal compliance measures by academics and professional services teams. She handles enquiries from university staff and post graduate students specifically pertaining to their research and is involved in strategic conversations around high-risk research and how these are impacted by legal compliance requirements. Chaitali has established policy, processes and guidance around the University's response to legal compliance issues, and she also represents the compliance function in relation to institutional level projects.

Tom Morgan
Lawyer,
CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP

Tom is a lawyer at international law firm CMS, specialising in the research and innovation sector. He is the former Head of Research Contracts and Research Compliance at the University of Bristol and co-led the award-nominated Research Contracts Transformation Project. He qualified as a lawyer while working in research contracts and worked in university research contracts teams for over 12 years before making the leap to private practice law. Tom also set up the newly established Research Compliance Team at Bristol, which advises on legal compliance for research activity such as Export Control, Subsidy Control, National Security & Investment and Nagoya Protocol.

11:30 – 12:00

Refreshment break & exhibition/ poster viewing

12:00 – 12:45

Arts & Humanities Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

The Arts & Humanities SIG drop-in session will provide the opportunity for research managers and administrators who support arts & humanities research to discuss topics that affect them. Most of our SIG members will also be members of other SIGs, but this session will cover topics such as REF, open research, research development, research partnerships and impact specifically in the context of arts & humanities.

Eleanor Glenton
Interim Deputy Head of Research Development, Durham University

Eleanor is supporting the Faculty of Arts and Humanities with all things research development. Prior to this she was the Research Grants and Contracts Officer for the faculty and for departments in both the Science and Social Sciences faculties. This varied experience has given her a real insight into the challenges and rewards of working across interdisciplinary boundaries.
Eleanor joined the university in 2003 having previously worked in research grant finance. This ‘inception to completion’ career path has given her an excellent breadth of understanding of the research funding landscape.

Christie Walker
Head of Research Development, Royal College of Art

Christie and her team support the breadth of pre- to post-award research, including proposal development, post-award management, ethics and research integrity, open research and the RCA Research Repository, research policy, researcher development, reporting, and not least of which, the RCA's REF submission.
Christie joined the RCA in 2015, and prior to this, she was a Strategy Development Manager for the Arts & Humanities Research Council and then a Research Base Liaison Manager at InnovateUK. Christie's time at the AHRC and now at the RCA have helped her develop a particular interest in working with and supporting practice research.

Audit & Compliance Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

Audit and Compliance Drop In Session to discuss post-award compliance and audit issues including:

  • The impact of due diligence on organisations and the inclusion of evidence and risk assessment in assurance reviews
  • Assurance updates and key trends in current programmes (Horizon:2020, US Federal Funds, InnovateUK/UKRI)
  • Horizon Europe Underwrite and state of play
  • The impact of personnel costs calculations for Horizon Europe and whether organisations should amend their time recording procedures to account for this or adapt existing procedures to reconcile by ½ day
  • With Horizon Europe organisations no longer receive overhead on the use of internal facilities but need to follow their usual accounting procedures which is FEC.

And any drop-in discussions as required!

Charles Shannon
Head of Research Management, Ulster University

Charles Shannon is considered a leading expert for research funding assurance and compliance in the UK.
He specialises in funder audits, compliance, assurance, risk management and due diligence. He supports funded organisations ensuring they have the necessary systems, policies, procedures, governance and strategies to adhere to the funder's terms, conditions and policy statements. He has worked with, coordinated and project managed a variety of funder audits or assurance visits.
He currently heads Research Management at Ulster University, leading post-award and contracts.
Charles consults with various Funding Organisations about their policies, procedures or assurance requirements

Ellen Thompson
Senior Grant Audit Manager, LEES Chartered Certified Accountants

Ellen is specialising in the audit of UK, European and US federal auditing across Europe and further afield. An alumni of the University of Stirling (Scotland) and University of Massachusetts - Amherst, she has worked in both the UK and US, and now resides in Norwich, UK, where she runs the LEES dedicated grant audit team, alongside Jonathan Gray. She regularly presents at international conferences on the nuances of grant auditing and is the former European co-editor of the NCURA magazine, the US-version of ARMA. She co-chairs the ARMA SIG on Audit & Compliance with Charles Shannon.

EU & International Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

The International SIG will be organising a drop-in session at the ARMA Conference on 15th November 2022. This will be an opportunity to drop in and ask any questions you have about the SIG and how we can collaborate and improve the SIG. I would also like to use this session to find out from you about and what activities, training sessions, events etc you would like the International SIG to organise over the next year.

Bikram Singh
Head of Research Finance & Compliance, Coventry University

Bikram Singh is the Head of Research Finance & Compliance at Coventry University. Previous to this job , he was working within Project management within University of Leicester and University of Birmingham.
He is a qualified accountant with a Masters in International Law. He is currently a Doctoral researcher within the Business School in Coventry researching on the ‘Performance and Sustainability of Strategic Business Units (Research Centres) within Universities’.
He is an active member of ARMA for a no. of years and is the champion for the International SIG

REF 2021: behind the scenes

There are many myths surrounding what happens to REF submissions once institutions press the submit button. The presenters have both had extensive experience of preparing REF submissions at the institutional level. They have also been seconded to Research England throughout the REF 2021 process and will discuss what happens behind the scenes and how the REF process is undertaken.
The session should provide valuable insights to research managers which will help them to debunk some of the REF myths and to provide more explanation on how REF panels conduct the assessment.
The session will be run "live" so will give attendees plenty of opportunity to ask questions and to gain further information, specific to their contexts.

Pauline Muya
Director, Muya Research Management Ltd

Pauline has been working in research management since 1993 in a range of roles and institutions covering the full range of activities. She is a veteran of 5 successive research assessment exercises. Since 2019, she has been working as a consultant supporting institutions with various projects, including REF preparations. Pauline has also been seconded to Research England since 2017 as a Panel Adviser for REF 2021, supporting panels with the criteria setting and assessment phases across Main Panels B, C and D.

Anna Grey
Director of Research Office, Edge Hill University

Anna Grey is Director of Research Office at Edge Hill University. Her previous role was Research Strategy and Policy Manager, including stints as the Deputy Head of Research Services at the University of York. She is the Champion of the ARMA REF SIG and was seconded to Research England as a Panel Adviser for REF 2021, supporting panels with the criteria setting and assessment phases across Main Panels A.

12:45 – 13:30

Lunch break & exhibition/ poster viewing

13:30 – 14:15

Principal Partner Session

Speaker to be confirmed

Speaker to be confirmed

In partnership with

14:30 – 15:15

ARMA Supporting Research Office’s Professional Development Needs

A primary objective of ARMA’s Professional Development Committee (PDC) is to establish and extend the Professional Development Portfolio (PDP) to flexibly support members across a range of roles and institutions. We are keen to understand the needs of our members and their research offices (RO) to maximize and streamline professional development opportunities and best practices across the sector.
The 2019 Research Administration as a Profession Survey results from over 4,000 international respondents found nearly half indicated their education/experience did not align to their RMA role. Further, nearly three-quarters reported they did not have prior interest in our profession and 15% did not feel their skills were a good match. Further, 2020 ARMA Research Office Survey completed by over 60% of UK ROs gave a strong indication of the evolving breadth and depth of knowledge, skills, and experiences required of RMAs. These findings emphasize the need to understand and meet the training and development requirements of the RMA profession.
The session will highlight relevant survey results with ARMA PDC Chairs providing context. Targeted questions will frame the discussion to identify training and development needs and best practices. Together the RMA community can shape the future of ARMA professional development portfolio.

Lisa Boyce
Head Pre-Award/Deputy
Director, Research and Innovation Services, University of Surrey

Dr Lisa Boyce, currently Head of Research Pre-Award /Deputy Director provides leadership and strategic direction supporting University of Surrey’s ambitious research growth targets. Prior, Lisa served as Research and Business Development Manager at Royal Holloway University of London, where she and her team were responsible for the life cycle of research services from pre-award to technology transfer for three faculties.
Previously, Lisa funded and managed multi-million dollars of international life sciences research for the US Government. Lisa is also an experienced researcher with nearly $1m awarded funding and over 40 peer-review publications/presentations, including being a Director of Research.

Lorna Wilson
Head of Research Development and Co-Director, Research and Innovation Services, University of Durham

As Head of Research Development within Research and Innovation Services at Durham University, Lorna leads a team in supporting academic colleagues across the Faculties to secure external research funding. Previously at Newcastle University, Lorna held a number of roles including in PGR support, business development, research group and conference management, as well as supporting REF2014, before entering into a research development role. She has extensive experience of providing specialist support to successful external funding applications. Lorna has a BA in Sociology (Strathclyde), and an MA(Res) in Sociology and Social Research (Newcastle). She completed the ARMA Certificate in Research Administration.

Saskia Walcott
Director, Walcott Communications Ltd

Saskia joined the ARMA Board in 2021 with appointment as Professional Development Committee Chair effective August 2022. Since 2010, Saskia worked with universities to train and mentor academics on how to embed impact in their work and to develop cultures that facilitate research impact. Her consulting career has been punctuated by in-house roles: interim Director of Strategic Engagement at UWE Bristol (2017) and Research Impact Manager at the University of Bath (2014-2015). Saskia’s enthusiasm for getting research out into the world was triggered as Head of Communications and Public Engagement for the Economic and Social Research Council (2003 - 2010).

Turning up the heat on Research Impact - transformation in Impact Culture beyond the REF

We will look back on how Northumbria University turned a poor impact performance in REF 2014 into the strongest element of its 2021 submission, which had tripled in size. While at the same time ensuring conversations about impact go beyond the REF.
We will share strategies we used for embedding impact in the research lifecycle and preparations for REF - such as how we ensured we were adequately resourced. Here we describe our methodology for undertaking a systematic review of research impact across a whole institution, achieving positive engagement from a broad cross-section of disciplines. We will share how we interpreted and presented a rich body of data to senior executives from the University and faculties; how we created reports that identified ‘hot spots’ where specific targeted support was required; how we presented this information to create a successful business case which increased resources and staffing.
Finally, we will describe how it energized engagement with impact beyond REF from senior academics, departments and faculties and helped to improve impact literacy, working towards an impact-rich culture.

Alisha Peart
Research Impact Manager, Northumbria University

Alisha Peart is Research Impact Manager at Northumbria, responsible for developing and implementing strategies to embed impact in the research culture and lead a transformative change to improve research impact outcomes, including Northumbria’s successful REF2021 results. Alisha has a national and international profile in Research Impact. She is the Impact Special Interest Group Co-Lead for the Association of Impact Managers and Administrators (ARMA) and has presented at seven national/international conferences. Alisha has co-authored a research publication in Palgrave Communications on REF Impact Case Studies and a book chapter in The Impactful Academic published in September 2022.

Lucy Jowett
Research Impact Manager, Northumbria University

Lucy is Research Impact Manager at Northumbria University, co-leading a team supporting impact throughout the research lifecycle. Since 2014 her leadership and expertise has resulted in exponential growth in engagement and resources devoted to impact at Northumbria. She shares her knowledge and enthusiasm for impact nationally and internationally, and has presented at ARMA and INORMS conferences, co-authored blog posts, and co-presented at the Australasian Research Managers Society Conference, winning the People’s Concurrent Session Presentation Prize. With 25 years senior experience in varied public sector roles, Lucy has a wide range of skills, including specialisms in communications and policy development.

Efficiency, Equity, Quality and Security in International Research Collaboration

Like assurance and due diligence, Trusted Research is an increasingly important part of the leadership, governance and risk management of research organisations and funders. It is a complex and challenging landscape that is not always well understood across the sector. In efforts to reduce and mitigate risk around Trusted Research it is essential for the sector to consider how this can be achieved with efficiency and without creating unnecessary bureaucracy.
By revisiting the ARMA report ‘Due Diligence in International Research – Options for Improved Efficiency, Equity and Quality’ published in April 2020, this project reflected on the recommendations as part of a solution to the identified challenges of trusted research. This session will present the findings from the ARMA led project ‘Efficiency, Equity, Quality and Security in International Research Collaboration’.

Sapna Marwaha
Director, ARMA UK, and Board Member, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science and Health

Sapna is a qualified solicitor with extensive experience of advising HEI’s and research funders on the legal implications of research and innovation activities including commercial contracts, intellectual property and governance. She began her career in research management in the research contracts team at the University of Glasgow. She progressed to leading a team of legal and contracts staff to support the research agenda as Head of Research Contracts at the University of Nottingham. She then became a legal advisor in medical research charities, Versus Arthritis and LifeArc, before establishing herself as an independent consultant and non-executive director.

Jennifer Johnson
Director, Research and Innovation Service, Northumbria University, and Chair, ARMA UK

Jennifer is Director of Research and Innovation Services at Northumbria University with responsibility for a wide range of research strategy, policy and support services and was the Head of Research Operations and Head of Research Performance and Governance at the University of Leeds for 10 years. Jennifer is committed to the professionalisation and recognition of the research management and administration sector and has sat on the ARMA Board of Directors since 2016. Jennifer was ARMA Director of Training & Development before undertaking a year as Chair Elect and becoming Chair of the Association in August 2020.

Linsey Dickson
Director of Research Services, University of Stirling

Linsey is Director of Research Services at the University of Stirling, leading teams focussing on delivery of increased grant capture; research operations including research integrity and governance and broader research performance. Linsey was on the Board of ARMA UK, chairing the Professional Development Committee and has overseen the refresh of ARMA’s professional qualifications and Professional Development Framework as well as leading the annual conference for the association. Currently she is also Chair of the INORMS (International Network of Research Management Societies) working group. INORMS supports and develops the international community of Research Managers and Administrators.

Joe Timlin
Research Development Manager, Northumbria University

Joe is Research Development Manager at Northumbria University. His portfolio includes developing ODA-eligible and other international research projects as well as overseeing the implementation of the University's QR GCRF Strategy and annual report to Research England. Joe joined the Pre-Award Team at Northumbria in 2018 having previously worked for funding bodies and arts organisations. Joe was Project Officer on the Research England and UKRI-funded ‘A consolidated approach to due diligence in international research’ project having been involved in the development of Northumbria’s due diligence process for international research projects and joined the team again for this review.

Eva Kagiri-Kalanzi
Project Manager, ARMA UK

Eva joined ARMA as the ReMPro Programme Manager - an initiative of the African Academy of Sciences in which ARMA was an implementing partner. As its programme manager, Eva was responsible for planning, implementing and managing various activities related to building the capacity of research management professionals. These include the International Research Management Staff Development Programme, a staff exchange programme between the UK and Africa. Eva now supports a wide range of ARMA initiatives, including the Research Engagement Programme for academic libraries and Efficiency, Equity, Quality and Security in International Research Collaboration.

How to turn a bad audit result into a transformational compliance journey!

When King’s College London received a limited assurance status in their UKRI funding audit in 2019 it started a transformative journey that would change the systems, processes, and culture of the university. A crucial step of this transformation was to form a One Team on Funder Compliance comprising of key players from all stakeholders, both from Faculty and central departments, to work to significantly improve the systems and processes that had been identified as failing in the UKRI audit. The successful One Team collaboration has resulted in the implementation of Worktribe, clear roles and responsibilities between the different actors involved in Research Administration, a set of targeted reports as well as the newly launched Research Funding Support Hub, a virtual platform for compliance tools and information. This session will focus mainly on the Post-Award aspects of the transformation that has made King’s meet the required targets and we have received an indication that we will soon be released from special measures and that the UKRI now sees King’s as an exemplar of good research administration!

Eva Bjorndal
Director of Post-Award, King's College London

Eva Björndal is the Director of Post-Award at King’s College London. In this role she leads the post-award services which are responsible for the financial management, audit preparations and financial compliance of externally funded grants, both national and international. Eva has 18 years of Research Management experience in leadership roles both in Sweden and the UK. She has given numerous workshops and presentations on Grants Management in Asia, Africa, Europe and the USA and is currently an elected Board Member of the National Council of University Administrators in the USA.

Cherice Walford
Senior Research Grants Administrator, King's College London

Cherice is currently a Senior Research Grants Administrator at King’s college London. She works in the Post Award Unit of the Research Management and Innovation Directorate where she supports a range of faculties including Cardiovascular, Psychology and Age-Related Diseases while relating with a variety of funders. Before joining King’s, Cherice worked in a variety of sectors with a significant amount of time being in the media space. Cherice enjoys ready and spending quality time with those closest to her.

Richard Obace
Senior Research Grants Administrator, King's College London

Richard is currently a Senior Research Grants Administrator at King’s college London. He works in the Post Award Unit of the Research Management and Innovation Directorate where he supports a range of faculties including Nursing, Natural Sciences and Mathematics with a variety of funders. His work revolves around external debt management, financial reporting, and related queries. Before coming to King’s, he previously worked for a UK based International Non-Governmental Organisation who have presence in several developing countries across several continents. His personal hobbies include sports and travel.

15:15 – 15:45

Refreshment break & exhibition/ poster viewing

15:45 – 16:30

Ethics, Governance and Best Practice Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

We would like to invite you to the Ethics, Governance and Best Practice (EG&BP) Special Interest Group (SIG) drop-in session. The session will be an opportunity for you to meet us, and to hear about the work we have been doing in our roles as ARMA SIG Champions. We would also like to use this session as an extension to the SIG drop-in meetings initiated this year, where members can bring an item for discussion with other members. If there are any topics you would like for us, the SIG champions, to take forward or look into you on behalf of the SIG community, please bring these with you. The drop-in session will be a safe space for everyone attending, so you are comfortable asking questions or discussing your experiences. For this reason, we won’t be recording the session.

Alison Lloyd
Research Ethics and Governance Manager, Manchester Metropolitan University

Alison is currently a Research Ethics and Governance Manager at Manchester Metropolitan University. her current role involves ensuring the University complies with the Concordat to Support Research Integrity. She also acts on behalf of the University Sponsor for all research requiring external body approval from inception and through the lifecycle of the research. Alison is also a registered nurse with a Master’s degree in Health Research. She has worked on international CTIMPs, as well as coordinating RCTs and CTIMPs within a Registered Clinical Trials Unit.

Sam Lewis
Research Governance Manager, University of Lincoln

Sam is an experienced Research Governance Manager with a demonstrated history of working in the higher education industry and NHS Research and Development. Skilled in Research Governance, Research Ethics & Integrity, Policy writing, QMS & Internal Audit and Data Management.

Post Award Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

The Post-Award Special Interest Group (SIG) will be organising a drop-in session at the ARMA Conference on 15th November 2022. This will be an opportunity to drop in and ask any questions you have about the post-award management of Research and Knowledge Exchange projects. I would also like to use this session to find out from you about what aspects of the SIG you find beneficial, what could be improved and what activities, training sessions, events etc you would like the Post-Award SIG to organise over the next year.

Anish Kurien
Research Delivery Manager, Manchester Metropolitan University

Anish Kurien is the Chair of the ARMA Post-Award Special Interest Group (SIG) and currently works as Research and Knowledge Exchange Delivery Manager at Manchester Metropolitan University. In this role, he is responsible for managing all externally funded research and KE projects in three of the faculties, ensuring that the funder regulations are complied with, and the income of the university is maximised. Having worked in Research Management over the last 15 years, he has extensive experience of Research Management covering the full spectrum of; Research Delivery (post-award), Research Development (pre-award), Research Ethics and Governance, Research Systems, REF and Impact, and PGR Student Management.
Anish is also a PRINCE 2 and MSP qualified Project Manager with an MBA in Information Management.

Research Evaluation Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session
Metrics and the Future of Research Assessment

An opportunity to discuss the implications of the Metric Tide Revisited and the early outputs from the UKRI Future Research Assessment Programme. Attendees will be invited to discuss the possible implications for the research managers working on strategy and the REF. The discussion will consider what the development in technologies, methodologies and uses of research metrics mean for training and development and ethics of the RMA profession.

Elizabeth Gadd
Research Policy Manager, Loughborough University, and Research Evaluation SIG Co-champion

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Gadd is Research Policy Manager at Loughborough University. She chairs the INORMS Research Evaluation Working Group and the ARMA Research Evaluation SIG. She founded the LIS-Bibliometrics Forum and The Bibliomagician Blog and was the recipient of the 2020 INORMS Award for Excellence in Research Management and Leadership.

Matt McCallum
Associate Director of Programmes, AHRC, and Research Evaluation SIG Co-champion

Matt is Associate Director of Programmes at the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) which is part of UK Research and Innovation. He oversees the design and delivery of funding opportunities for the arts and humanities research communities. He is a Director of the Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA) and chairs the Member Engagement Committee.

From PRISMs to Research Enablers: empowering people to benefit universities, teams and research

Research support staff come in many forms and provide an important pillar of the research community. However, they rarely feel like they are properly recognised for their contribution or valued for their input to the research ecosystem. Often feeling isolated, like they’re the only one doing their role or like an “odd sock”.
National networks, such as PRISMS, aim to link these staff together and advocate on their behalf, but they are not always well promoted or accessed within institutions.
Recent funding to develop Research Culture is opening space to explore these roles, the support they’re given and how institutions can empower individuals, recognise their contributions and the benefits they bring to universities, teams and research.
Earlier this year, research Supporters at the Universities of Bath and York acquired funds to explore this further. This session will explore what methods they used, what the outcomes are, as well as allowing time for participants to discuss what the situation is in their institutions and what best practice and ways forward might look like.
We will be joined by a colleague from the PRISMs network to highlight the work they do and consider how national networks can boost local projects.

Rachel Willis
Research Manager, University of Bath

Rachel has worked at the University of Bath for 7 years, currently as Research Manager to the Department of Social and Policy Sciences. She facilitates all aspects of their research and works with the academic team to develop a supportive and effective research environment. She is currently doing a coaching apprenticeship alongside her role, to further develop the ways in which she can support others to achieve their full potential.

Chloe Turner
Programme Grant Manger, University of Bath

Chloe is programme manager for SynHiSel, developing novel materials and membranes for chemical separations. Working to facilitate effective and productive interaction between researchers, she ensures effective delivery of the research programme and its impact over the long term and coordinates the day-to-day management. Chloe has also worked in the University of Bath research office as a Research Development Manager and as a Senior Portfolio Manager at EPSRC, with responsibilities for policy development to support skills and research leadership. Chloe has a PhD in Geomicrobiology from Cardiff University and a Masters of Earth Sciences from Oxford University.

Cheryl Rothwell
Centre Coordinator, University of Bath

Cheryl is Centre Coordinator for the Made Smarter Innovation: Centre for People-Led Digitalisation and has many years supporting academics, research staff and PGRs in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath. She loves the challenge of working with teams from the Universities of Bath, Loughborough and Nottingham as well as industrial partners in her centre role. Previously she was Department Coordinator for Mechanical Engineering. She’s particularly valued by her colleagues for her unflappableness, as well as being able to think outside the box.

Fleur Hughes
STFC Air Quality Network Manager, University of York

Fleur Hughes has worked at the University of York for nine years, as Project Manager on a research project in Social Policy, and currently as Network Manager for an STFC-funded network plus. Fleur is an active member of the national PRISM network, and leads a network of PRISMs in similar roles at the University of York, providing peer support and advocating for the support and development of this group to the university.

Rachel Sparks
Strategic Project Manager, University of Newcastle

Rachel is Strategic Project Manager for the Science Agriculture & Engineering Faculty (SAgE) at Newcastle University. In this role she develops, manages, and monitors the implementation of a variety of strategic projects to support the Faculty and University vision and strategy. A substantive part of her role is to also lead and manage the Research Project Managers Team based within SAgE. Rachel’s background is both Academic and Managerial, this experience includes: BSc & PhD in Physics, Fellowships in Russia & France, Manager – NanoCentre Flinders University, Grants Manager - BP International Centre for Advanced Materials and Research Proposal Editor, Stanford University.

19:30 – 21:00

Emerald Quiz

Back by popular demand – the ARMA Quiz hosted by our favourite quiz master John Eggleton of Emerald Publishing.
Pit your wits against the biggest brains in the ARMA membership in a fun quiz covering all manner of things (except sport!).
Any requests for specialist rounds, please tweet John @Emerald_JEgg prior to conference – you never know, they might get included!

Day 2 Virtual

9:00 – 9:30

Login & exhibition/ poster viewing

9:30 – 10:15

Panel Discussion

In this session, the panel will discuss:

  • The future of research & innovation funding
  • Equitable international collaboration and national security
  • How the research sector responds to geopolitical crises e.g. Russia/Ukraine, Afghanistan

Frances Wood
International Director, UKRI

Frances Wood is International Director at UKRI and is responsible for delivering on the UKRI strategy through international collaboration, including new international funds, Horizon Europe Plan B Global. She leads the UKRI international including the four UKRI overseas offices (India, North America, China and Brussels).

Frances was previously the Regional Director for the Science and Innovation Network (SIN), covering Europe, Russia, Turkey and Israel. Across her career at the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO), Frances has led on research and innovation related policies including as Economic Counsellor in South Korea.

Frances is passionate about equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI).

Jamie Arrowsmith
Interim Acting Director, Universities UK International

Jamie Arrowsmith has been Acting Director of UUKi since 1 August 2022. He joined Universities UK in 2010, working as policy lead for research and innovation before becoming Assistant Director for Policy & Global Engagement at UUKi in 2017. Jamie has a first-class degree and MA in History from the University of Manchester, and an MRes from Manchester Metropolitan University. Prior to joining UUK, he was a researcher at the MMU Education & Social Research Institute.

10:30 – 11:15

Non-traditional career paths: could ‘gig workers’ be the future of RMA?

Our expectations of where we work and how we do it has changed. Catalysed by the pandemic, many of us have seen that alternative ways of working are possible. This session asks whether the pandemic has highlighted opportunities for alternative career paths in the world of research? There have always been RMAs that become consultants, and it seems to be an attractive option for those at the latter stages of their careers. If you are in the early stages of your career, is pursuing non-traditional employment such a good idea? Opting out of formal employment structures comes with many challenges. But in a changing world of work where the ‘gig worker’ is becoming an increasingly accepted model of work, might non-traditional career paths become the norm in years to come?
This live webinar will feature three speakers who will offer a range of views for a lively debate on non-traditional career trajectories in the wider research environment with an opportunity for attendees to share their views by voting during the session.

Saskia Walcott
Director, Walcott Communications Ltd

Since 2010 Saskia has worked independently with universities to train and mentor academics on how to embed impact in their work and to develop cultures that facilitate research impact. Her consulting career has been punctuated by in-house roles: interim Director of Strategic Engagement at UWE Bristol 2017, and Research Impact Manager at the University of Bath between 2014 and 2015. From University Saskia was employed at a variety of PR agencies, pursuing a very traditional career trajectory, until leaving her position as Head of Communications at the ESRC.

Edwin Colyer
Director, Scientia Scripta

Edwin is a specialist with 25 years’ experience in research communications and stakeholder engagement. Edwin has had a varied career having worked in the research and policy space both as an in-house employee, and as an external freelance journalist and writer. His latest in-house role was for Manchester Met, where he helped to deliver its REF submission. His main focus is now Scientia Scripta a research communications agency which he founded in 2011.

Cat Walker
Researcher, The Researchery

Cat is an Economic Psychologist by training with a decade of working in academia as a research fellow at the University of Exeter. Once leaving academia she has worked in and with the UK voluntary sector becoming a well-respected authority on the voluntary sector funding environment among other aspects. In 2015 Cat set up an independent research consultancy, The Researchery, helping individual clients to make more effective decisions for future best practice, while furthering the collective body of knowledge that the wider voluntary sector relies on.

Transforming Research Contracts – The Hero's Journey

Research Contracts are complex, important, relentless, and gnarly, and often those left negotiating them end up under siege by various stakeholders across their institution. But it doesn’t have to be this way.
The University of Bristol, from 2019-2021, delivered a transformation project that has been shortlisted for an Innovation & Excellence Award for Strategic Achievement by the World Commerce & Contracting.
Did we mention average turnaround times were reduced to a quarter of their historic high?
In this session we aim to share the pain, frustration, call to adventure, failures, and hard-won successes. We’ll explore the cultural changes, the framework used, as well as specific practical steps taken.

Tom Morgan
Lawyer,
CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP

Tom is a lawyer at international law firm CMS, specialising in the research and innovation sector. He is the former Head of Research Contracts and Research Compliance at the University of Bristol and co-led the award-nominated Research Contracts Transformation Project. He qualified as a lawyer while working in research contracts and worked in university research contracts teams for over 12 years before making the leap to private practice law. Tom also set up the newly established Research Compliance Team at Bristol, which advises on legal compliance for research activity such as Export Control, Subsidy Control, National Security & Investment and Nagoya Protocol.

Ali Evans
Director of Research Contracts, Compliance and Governance University of Bristol

Ali Evans has been Director of Contracts, Compliance and Governance at the University of Bristol since 2019. Before that she worked at the University of Bath for twenty years, gaining experience across all aspects of research support including, Pre-Award, Contracts, Bid Development, Business Development, technology transfer and project management. Before joining Bath Ali worked at BBSRC and before that at the Royal Society. She has a PhD in Neuroscience and a BSc in Zoology both from Imperial College. Ali is a long-standing member of ARMA and currently serves on the Finance and Governance Committee and Board as ARMA Treasurer.

Oliver Geidel
Head of Research Contracts and Compliance, University of Bristol

Oliver Geidel is the Head of Research Contracts and Research Compliance at the University of Bristol, having a background as a commercial property solicitor in private practice before joining research contracts in 2020. He has a particular interest in team wellbeing, project management and information governance.

Strengthening capacity for responsible knowledge exchange, engagement, and impact

Research impact and knowledge exchange policies and practices are evolving rapidly: this session offers opportunities for delegates to reflect on and discuss knowledge exchange, engagement, and impact (KEEI) practice, policy, and institutional culture, and consider the broader implication and horizons of framing KEEI from a more responsible, principled, and sustainable angle than what has been sometimes previously associated with the so-called 'impact agenda’.
This interactive session will have two parts: the first part will report on a collaborative piece of research co-led between professional and academic staff, involving interviews and co-design workshops to contribute to understanding and promoting responsible KEEI practices. This project draws reflections and expertise from professional and academic KEEI leaders across the University of Oxford in order to co-produce policy and practice recommendations and development resources in partnership with relevant professional communities. The project will culminate in the co-designing of online resources and training materials to support researchers and professional staff.
The second part of the session will provide opportunity for attendees to discuss and contribute their own reflections on, and practices relating to, responsible KEEI, and perspectives on what policies and resources might best support them in their professional KEEI practice.

Aileen Marshall-Brown
Head of Engagement (Social Sciences Division), University of Oxford

Aileen is Head of Engagement for the Social Sciences Division at the University of Oxford, leading a team supporting the University's diverse social sciences community with public, policy and business engagement, KE, innovation, and impact activities. Aileen is an engagement and impact professional with 17 years’ HE experiences starting as an engaged researcher, collaborative project manager and network coordinator at the University of Highlands and Islands. In 2012, Aileen joined the professional services community at Oxford, firstly in Humanities supporting the REF2014 impact case studies, and then in Social Sciences, facilitating and developing a positive culture for engagement and impact.

Alis Oancea
Professor of Philosophy of Education and Research Policy, University of Oxford

Alis is Professor of Philosophy of Education and Research Policy at the University of Oxford and Project Lead (Research on Research) at the ESRC Centre for Global Higher Education. Through scholarly and professional collaborations, she champions knowledge, justice, generosity and integrity in research practices and discourses, research policy, university research leadership and cultures. She has led and collaborated on research projects, change initiatives, and impact and KE administrative processes. She has conducted research on research ecosystems, values in research, open knowledge, impact, ethics and integrity, epistemic diversity, research careers, understandings of quality and excellence, research assessment, and principled research practice.

Juliet Scott-Barrett
Post-doctoral Researcher, University of Oxford

Juliet is a postdoctoral researcher and training officer at the University of Oxford. She completed her PhD at the University of Edinburgh, where she worked with Lego and photography to explore children’s perspectives on school environments, communication, and play. She was previously a Project Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning where she explored inclusive practices in Higher Education and worked on cycles of Participatory Action Research identifying and addressing barriers to equal and accessible academic opportunities for all. She originally trained as a teacher, and is interested in creativity, participatory research and responsible KE and impact.

Szilvi Watson
Doctoral Research Assistant, University of Oxford

Szilvi is a PhD student at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education. She is a doctoral research assistant on the Responsible KEEI project and on the Research-on-Research project in the Centre for Global Higher Education. Her doctoral research pertains to the experiences of religious postgraduate students, following her research conducted for her MSc in Research Design and Methodology. Previously Szilvi was senior project manager of a world-wide science and religion project at Oxford University’s Materials Department. She is a qualified teacher with extensive experience in varied settings and has an interest in higher education research.

Innovate within your Place: where and how to get funding

Place is a central theme across policy and in the Academy especially of importance to the regions within England. Furthermore, Place operates as a core concept at different levels of authority and Government Policy and administration, for example in the Levelling up Agenda, heavily influencing opportunities for innovation and partnership working.
Building on the learning from the ARMA 2022 Place matters seminar series, this session will explore the dimensions of Place and Funding for HEIs and disseminate and discuss a number of novel tools and methods for supporting HEIs’ involvement with the wider Place agenda.
Place, and the role of universities, is articulated differently by different Funders and understanding how this works is of relevance to Managers in deciding which to pursue and how to best connect research towards the need and strengths of Place.
The interactive session will provide an overview on where and how to get funding for research and innovation work dedicated to Place as well as sharing approaches and best practice on how different policy and funding streams can be brought together to support Place-relevant impact, research partnership and innovation activity to bring benefit to an area/region or nation of the UK.

Camelia Dijkstra
Head of Research Services, University of Wolverhampton

Camelia is a strategic leader with 15 years’ experience of research and business management and leadership in UK Universities. In her role as the Head of Research Services at the University of Wolverhampton she has a strong interest in promoting and delivering on the region’s strong Place agenda. Alongside her work on the ARMA’s Place Matters seminar series, Camelia is chairing the UPEN subcommittee on regional matters. She is an expert evaluator for calls within Horizon Europe and national funders. Camelia has a scientific research background in biosciences, microgravity and space-related research at the University of Nottingham.

Jenny Taylor
Head of Economic Development, Durham University

Jenny is an experienced and successful senior manager in the sector, responsible for developing and delivering a broad portfolio of knowledge exchange programmes and partnerships at Durham University including a University Enterprise Zone at NETPark, the Northern Accelerator spin out programme and a region wide SME PhD programme. Jenny has over 20 years’ experience in public funding, regional economic growth and impact used to deliver institutional strategic change and delivery of significant new place-based activity.

11:15 – 11:45

Refreshment break & exhibition/ poster viewing

11:45 – 12:30

Medical and Health Services Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

The Medical and Health Services (MHS) Special Interest Group (SIG) drop-in session will be an opportunity for you to hear about what SIG related activity has and is taking place. This session will be an opportunity for members to bring an item for discussion and to share best practice. If there are any topics you would like to be taken forward or to be look into you on behalf of the SIG community, please bring these with you. The drop-in session will be a safe space for everyone attending, so you are comfortable asking questions or discussing your experiences. For this reason, we won’t be recording the session.

Alison Lloyd
Research Ethics and Governance Manager, Manchester Metropolitan University

Alison is currently a Research Ethics and Governance Manager at Manchester Metropolitan University. her current role involves ensuring the University complies with the Concordat to Support Research Integrity. She also acts on behalf of the University Sponsor for all research requiring external body approval from inception and through the lifecycle of the research. Alison is also a registered nurse with a Master’s degree in Health Research. She has worked on international CTIMPs, as well as coordinating RCTs and CTIMPs within a Registered Clinical Trials Unit.

Open Research Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

The Open Research SIG drop in will take the form of an open discussion of the core topics covered by the scope of the SIG. We invite attendees to watch the On Demand webinar for an overview of the topics and join the drop in with some examples of activities from their institution to add to the discussion. No experience necessary, just interest

Valerie McCutcheon
Research Information Manager, University of Glasgow

Valerie represents ARMA on the Open Research Competencies Coalition and Jisc Open Research Advisory Board. She is a founder and Editorial Advisory Board member for the Open Access Books Toolkit. She is a contributor to, and Editorial Board member for, the How to be FAIR with your data (uni-goettingen.de) book.
She has a lead role in open research at the University of Glasgow. Previously she led developments to the University of Glasgow Research System and fostered linkage of the repository to core systems.
Her work history includes managing information for land and seismic surveys, oil wells, clinical trials, and software houses.

Kirsty Wallis
Head of Research Liaison, University College London (UCL)

Kirsty currently manages Research Support and Open Science activity at UCL in her role leading the day-to-day activity of the UCL Office for Open Science & Scholarship. She represents the UK in the Knowledge Exchange Open Science Expert Group and is about to commence her PhD in the UCL Department of Information Studies.
Kirsty is a member of two EU funded Citizen Science projects as well as a member of the European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) Working Group for Citizen Science in Universities. She is also a section editor for an upcoming LIBER book, Citizen Science for Research Libraries – A Guide

Research Excellence Framework (REF) Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

Following on from the REF 2021 results, the drop-in session will be an interactive, collaborative and hopefully light hearted event which will give those involved in the REF process an opportunity to discuss how REF went, lessons learnt from managing REF submissions and results, key lessons from the EDAP, IDAP and panel level reports and how to discuss planning for the next REF (or whatever comes next) without mentioning REF.

Anna Grey
Director of Research Office, Edge Hill University

Anna Grey is Director of Research Office at Edge Hill University. Her previous role was Research Strategy and Policy Manager, including stints as the Deputy Head of Research Services at the University of York. She is the Champion of the ARMA REF SIG and was seconded to Research England as a Panel Adviser for REF 2021, supporting panels with the criteria setting and assessment phases across Main Panels A.

Dr Catriona Firth
Associate Director, Research England, Research Environment

Catriona is providing strategic leadership of Research England’s portfolio of policy work aimed at ensuring an effective environment for research within English universities. This includes policies relating to: responsible research assessment (including the Future Research Assessment Programme), research careers, equality, diversity and inclusion, open research, and research integrity.
Catriona previously worked in the REF 2021 team as Head of REF Policy. Prior to joining Research England, she worked in a number of UK universities in academic and research professional roles.

Supporting the community adoption of Resume for Research and Innovation (R4RI)-like narrative CVs

UKRI is committed to supporting culture change across the research and innovation (R&I) sector.
However, culture change will not happen if just UKRI changes, we need others to join us on this journey. One part of UKRI’s role in this is supporting R&I community adoption of the Royal Society’s Résumé for Researchers (R4R)-like CVs. This is by working with partners across the research and innovation sector, nationally and internationally.
To support the adoption of the R4R-like CV model, UKRI has created communities of practice and dissemination events.
The JFG group explores shared approaches towards a R4R-like CV in funding decisions and
The AUG group has been co-developed in partnership with Universities UK (UUK) to complement the efforts of the JFG and explore the alternative applications of R4R-like CV in the assessment of people. For example, hiring and promotion.
This session will share information about the ways the groups are approaching adoption and co-developing resources, including a shared evaluation framework that will help build the evidence base in this space.

Hilary Noone
Research & Innovation Culture Lead, UKRI

Passionate about social justice, equity and collaboration, Hilary consolidates over 20 years of private, government and research sector experience in her role at UKRI as Research & Innovation Culture Lead. Here, Hilary leads the R&I sector roll out of Resume for Researcher (R4R)-like narrative CVs among other projects focused on good practice in R&I culture. Hilary also volunteers as ARMA’s Research Culture Lead, coordinating across ARMA’s wide community to deliver a programme that aims to inform and empower all Research Managers and Administrators (RMAs) to be agents of change, influencing positive, inclusive, and creative research and innovation cultures.

Ruhena Begum
Senior Strategy Advisor, UK Research & Innovation (UKRI)

Ruhena works in the UKRI Research and Innovation (R&I) Culture Team, which includes supporting the Joint Funders Group and Alternative Uses Group to explore a shared approach towards the narrative CV in funding and alternative uses. Before joining the R&I culture team, she spent many years working in the UKRI International Development Team leading and supporting the delivery of activities for the Newton Fund, Global Challenges Research Fund and ODA policy.

Daniel Wake
Policy Manager, Universities UK

Daniel leads research policy programme, which includes activities on university research funding, culture, impact and collaboration.
Before Universities UK, he worked for the British Universities Finance Directors Group and the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy. Daniel studied politics at Loughborough University and spent a semester at Lund University in Sweden. He has an MA in Media and Cultural Analysis, also from Loughborough.
Daniel enjoys working for a friendly and influential organisation in a vital and rewarding sector

12:30 – 13:15

Lunch break & exhibition/ poster viewing

13:15 – 14:00

CARDEA: Research Manager Careers

Cardea is the Roman Goddess of the hinge. Ideal to describe our Horizon Europe project to develop Research Managers (RM) who strengthen Europe's R&I excellence through a diverse set of support roles and responsibilities.

Research Management as a profession is almost invisible from a policy, career development and career progression. Many RM’s come to the profession by circuitous routes which are rarely linear. Also, there is little consistency between countries, funders, policymakers and individual institutions with regards to RM’s.

Amongst the impacts of Cardea will be an enduring network and Hub that can facilitate RM development and collaboration, a validated methodology to assess RM careers and a well-established baseline against which improvements can be objectively measured.

This will allow CARDEA to develop an RM Charter similar to the EC Charter and Code for Researchers to ensure that RM contributions and careers are no longer invisible.

*Career Acknowledgement for Research (Manager) Delivering for the European Area

Marykate O’Regan
HR Business Manager and Co-PI CARDEA, University College Cork

Marykate is Co-PI on the Horizon Europe funded project CARDEA. She leads the successful HR Excellence in Research programme for UCC She created and delivers the innovative and successful Odyssey Programme. She is responsible for aligning University and HR strategy with researcher career objectives and assists both research staff and management in UCC's diverse and high performing research centres. As a result of Mary's positive impact on HR service provision she received the UCC Staff Recognition Award for Leadership.

Marykate has a Master’s in Research Policy, Post Graduate Diploma Computer Science and BA English and Archaeology. Marykate lives in Carrigaline, Co. Cork, Ireland with her husband Stephen and daughter Amy.

Twitter @marykateucc

14:15 – 15:00

RAAAP-3: How I Became a Research Manager and Administrator (HIBARMA)

Research administration as a profession (RAAAP) is evolving globally. Better understanding of the trends, diversity, breadth and differences within our profession can inform our practice. In this interactive session we will explore the diverse skills, training and expertise of research managers and administrators (RMAs) on an international scale, and what led us to become RMAs.
We will be drawing on the RAAAP survey results, first conducted in 2016, again in 2019, and most recently in 2022. In 2016, 2,691 RMAs from 64 countries participated in RAAAP, the following iteration elicited 4,324 responses from 74 countries, and this year we received over 5,000.
Evidence from data informs our daily work and provide strategic insights that help run our research offices, develop institutional and national policies relating to our job, and the RMA profession more widely.
In this session, you will learn about RMA global highlights from RAAAP data, with a particular focus on global trends and geographic differences. Together, we will explore RMA demographics, education, work situation, progression, and more.
The RAAAP data is a powerful evidence base about, and for, the profession of research managers and administrators, we'll help you learn how to use it!

Simon Kerridge
Founder and Principal Consultant, Kerridge Research Consulting
University of Kent

Simon has over 30 years' experience as a research manager and administrator. He has extensive networks in the field, is a former chair of ARMA the UK association, and currently sits on the board of EARMA the European association. He has a passion for research management and administration (RMA) as a profession and leads the INORMS RAAAP TaskForce (https://inorms.net/activities/raaap-taskforce/) collecting longitudinal about the RMA profession around the world. Simon holds a doctorate in research management and administration and is adjunct faculty on the Johns Hopkins international master’s in research administration.

Melinda Fischer
Senior Research Administrator, Clemson University

Melinda has worked in research administration since 2009 at Clemson University, in sunny South Carolina, U.S. Beginning her research administration journey in post-award, she transitioned to pre-award in 2013. She currently supports the College of Education as the Manager of the Office of Research Services. At Clemson University, Melinda is serving as President of the Staff Senate. Professionally, Melinda has served as the NCURA Region III Philanthropy Coordinator, and the Sponsorship Coordinator, Global Track Lead for the 2021 NCURA PRA Virtual Conference, and Program Committee Member for NCURA Region III 2021 Regional Conference. She is Co-PI of the RAAAP-3 Project.

Cristina Oliveira
Funding Adviser Coordinator, NOVA University Lisbon

Cris has over 10 years' experience as a Research Manager and Administrator and has been a key player in the development of PIC the Portuguese association for Professionals at the Interface of Science. She is a partner in the EU foRMAtion project developing RMA modules for undergraduate students and part of the new EU funded RM ROADMAP project developing the profession in Widening Countries. She is Co-PI of the RAAAP-3 project.

Madhuri Dutta
Head, Centre for Operational and Research Excellence, CORE India, George Institute for Global Health

Madhuri has over 12 years' experience as an RMA and currently heads research operations for the George Institute for Global Health in India. She is a fellow of the Wellcome DBT India Research Management Initiative (IRMI) and member of IRMI Professional Development Committee, in addition to being a Co-PI of the RAAAP-3 project. Madhuri holds a Doctorate degree in Biochemistry and is an adjunct faculty at the Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal University.

The Concordat and Agreement Review (CAR): a vehicle for change in research cultures and environments

A commission by UKRI, Universities UK (UUK) and Wellcome led to the first ever mapping of a complex landscape of initiatives that shape research cultures and environments in the UK.
The Concordat and Agreement Review (CAR) shed light on the collective role these initiatives have played in shaping research culture and have enabled an opportunity for sector-wide collaboration and understanding on an important aspect of research culture in the UK.
This session will provide the community with the background to the CAR project and engage them in the latest developments. It aims to encourage the community to help share the driving, contribute to the CAR’s future direction of travel as it explores how these initiatives can increase efficiency, capacity and influence on research cultures and environments.

Daniel Wake
Policy Manager, Universities UK

Daniel leads research policy programme, which includes activities on university research funding, culture, impact and collaboration.
Before Universities UK, he worked for the British Universities Finance Directors Group and the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy. He studied politics at Loughborough University and spent a semester at Lund University in Sweden. Daniel has an MA in Media and Cultural Analysis, also from Loughborough.
He enjoys working for a friendly and influential organisation in a vital and rewarding sector.

Tripti Rana Magar
Project Manager, UK Research & Innovation (UKRI)

Tripti started her career as a Project Support Officer at UKRI and now works as a Project Manager still at UKRI and part of the Project Delivery and Improvement Directorate. She studied Business and Management at University of Portsmouth and also completed her MSc in Project Management at Portsmouth University. Currently, Tripti helps manage and coordinate the Concordats and Agreement Review project. On days when she is not working you can find her playing badminton or going on food tours around London.

Hilary Noone
Research & Innovation Culture Lead, UK Research & Innovation (UKRI)

Passionate about social justice, equity and collaboration, Hilary consolidates over 20 years of private, government and research sector experience in her role at UKRI as Research & Innovation Culture Lead. Here, Hilary leads the R&I sector roll out of Resume for Researcher (R4R)-like narrative CVs among other projects focused on good practice in R&I culture. Hilary also volunteers as ARMA’s Research Culture Lead, coordinating across ARMA’s wide community to deliver a programme that aims to inform and empower all Research Managers and Administrators (RMAs) to be agents of change, influencing positive, inclusive, and creative research and innovation cultures.

Evaluating global universities responsibly: the INORMS More Than Our Rank initiative

The UK Government’s new High Potential Visa scheme offers an open invitation to graduates from any of the top 50 HEIs in three global university rankings: the QS, ARWU, and Times Higher. This has lent further legitimacy to university rankings despite their validity being strongly contested. The INORMS Research Evaluation Group have long argued against the use of university rankings as a responsible means of assessment. In 2020 they produced some ranker ratings to demonstrate how far short of community-agreed standards for responsible research evaluation the rankings fall. They are now turning their attention to a mechanism by which the world’s universities can declare how they are much ‘More Than Our Rank’. This session will outline the background to the initiative, the mechanism by which universities can adopt it, and provide an opportunity for participants to discuss how they might initiate conversations with their own organisations with a view to supporting it.

Elizabeth Gadd
Research Policy Manager, Loughborough University

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Gadd is Research Policy Manager at Loughborough University. She chairs the INORMS Research Evaluation Working Group and the ARMA Research Evaluation SIG. She founded the LIS-Bibliometrics Forum and The Bibliomagician Blog and was the recipient of the 2020 INORMS Award for Excellence in Research Management and Leadership.

Collective action: building communities to increase our impact in EDI

Collective action is critical to moving the dial in EDI. EDIS was established in recognition that we need to build community at all levels. EDIS is a coalition of organisations across science and health. We bring together organisations across the sector so that we can work collectively to learn, network and campaign on the issues that matter to us. From within our membership, we support individuals to set up employee networks, to find their peers and build connections across the sector and to keep up to speed on EDI best practice. We are bringing together a panel from within our coalition who have experience of building community in different ways and who can share the benefits, pitfalls, and learnings with us all. This will be an interactive session with an opportunity to ask questions.

Lilian Hunt
Programme Lead – EDIS, EDIS

Lilian received their PhD in Genetics from UCL whilst at The Francis Crick Institute. It was here that they helped bring together Wellcome, The Francis Crick Institute and GSK as founders of EDIS in 2016 and has developed the coalition since. Lilian runs the EDIS programme of work including managing the coalition, supporting its members, developing its strategy, and delivering events and projects. Lilian draws on their research experience, lived experience as a queer person in science and EDI knowledge to drive an evidence-based approach to inclusion.

15:00 – 15:30

Refreshment break & exhibition/ poster viewing

15:30 – 16:15

Research Development Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

SIG RD members are invited to drop-in to say hello, meet peers, and share experiences. Issues we may touch upon will vary from strategic matters to operational challenges in research development that the SIG members have been thinking over the last year. We will select up to three topics from the following non-inclusive list which will be extended further until the conference:


  • Embedding research culture in research development roles
  • Research Development - professional development needs
  • Addressing inequality in funding trends
  • Managing challenges in a changing funding landscape (e.g. international funding; UK’s accession to Horizon Europe)
  • Research support community in your organisation – how well connected are you?
  • Building bid repositories
  • Funding information systems – what works?
  • Tools for generating new project ideas
  • Pre-award to post-award project handovers

Members will also have a chance to agree on plans for SIG activities.

Dr Aygen Kurt-Dickson
Research and Innovation Strategy Manager, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and ARMA SIG Research Development Champion

Aygen has a strong interest and background in research and innovation policy. She has developed multiple aptitudes in her career over the last decade in-between academic and administrative facets of higher education. In addition to her R&I role, she also works as Policy Fellow at LSE’s International Inequalities Institute. Aygen focuses on strategy development in research and knowledge exchange funding; and connecting social science-based research to innovation for impactful outcomes. She is an expert facilitator for interdisciplinary and collaborative research projects; an independent grant evaluator for European Commission grants; and an expert on research funding policy from an HEI perspective.

Research Impact Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

New to impact or have a specific query you’d like to discuss? Bring it to the drop-in session where the SIG leads along with other SIG members at this session will be on hand to talk about all things impact. We’re also keen to hear your views: what would you like from your Impact SIG in terms of training, events or networking opportunities? Contribute your ideas to help shape the SIG’s future.

Dr Pauline Addis
Research Impact Officer, Newcastle University

Pauline began her impact career in 2011 by writing up case studies for the 2014 REF. Over 11 years, this role expanded and now includes training, developing strategic partnerships and contributing to national consultations.

Alisha Peart
Research Impact Manger, Northumbria University

Alisha jointly led the transformative change in the research impact culture at Northumbria University, culminating in the outstanding success for Northumbria in the 2021 Research Excellence Framework Assessment. Alisha is also the Impact Special Interest Group Co-Lead for the Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA). She has presented and delivered training at national/international conferences and workshops.

Lucy Jowett
Research Impact Manger, Northumbria University

Lucy’s expertise, enthusiasm and commitment to impact-rich research culture contributed to an outstanding result for Northumbria in the 2021 research assessment. She contributes thought leadership and supports networking and training on research impact nationally and internationally.

Research into Research Management and Administration Special Interest Group: Drop-In Session

This drop-in session will supply an update of current Research into RMA. It will also provide a space for colleagues to share ideas for RMA themed research projects and will extend the discussion started in our SIG On-Demand Webinar about the routes to publication for Research into RMA projects. Hope you can join us for an informal and friendly discussion.

Dr Christopher Daley
Research Development Manager (Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences)
Royal Holloway, University of London

Christopher has over ten years’ experience working in both academic and professional services positions within higher education. He holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Westminster and originally worked in academia before moving into research support roles, initially within scholarly communications and more recently in posts focused on research development and research strategy. He is also the founder and Co-Director of the Engaged Humanities Lab at Royal Holloway which aims to create diverse partnerships between academia, the cultural sector and local community organisations as well as promote the societal value of arts and humanities research.

Alicen Nickson
Director, Research and Innovation
Cranfield University

A highly motivated leader and specialist research and innovation manager, Alicen is Director, Research, and Innovation at Cranfield University. Previously at Royal Holloway, Alicen has extensive experience of research life-cycle management at operational and strategic levels, she delivers wide ranging initiatives by working in partnership with colleagues at all levels. Alicen strives to deliver excellence and to provide an enabling environment in which her staff can excel and in which collaborations can grow and thrive. With a passion for continuous improvement, she drives research agendas to explore ‘what works’ in research management, to both impact the international research management community and underpin her own professional practice.

Understanding how research-enabling professionals’ experience research culture using a redesigned Café Culture Toolkit

A joint initiative by the universities of Bath Spa, Glasgow, Loughborough, and Queens University Belfast in partnership with ARMA, MI TALENT, Praxis-Auril, and PRISM, led to a redesign of the Wellcome Trust Café Culture Toolkit for use with research and innovation-enabling professionals. The resulting toolkit was piloted at the University of Glasgow and Queen's University Belfast to garner a better understanding of research-enabling professionals’ perception of their contribution to, and their experience of, research culture. At this workshop participants will be introduced to the toolkit and the experiences of those who have used it to design and run Café Culture workshops will be shared. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions about the process, leading on to a more wide-ranging discussion as to how the sector can address issues of parity and inclusion amongst our research communities.

Chris Browne
Senior Research Strategy and Policy Manager, Queen's University Belfast

Chris has 10 years’ experience in research management and administration. In his role he leads on programme management of the University’s Research and Innovation Strategy and is responsible for broader internal and external policy developments. He led on the development of the University’s Research Culture Action Plan and was institutional Manager for the University’s REF 2021 submission.

Elizabeth Gadd
Research Policy Manager, Loughborough University

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Gadd is Research Policy Manager at Loughborough University. She chairs the INORMS Research Evaluation Working Group and the ARMA Research Evaluation SIG. She founded the LIS-Bibliometrics Forum and The Bibliomagician Blog and was the recipient of the 2020 INORMS Award for Excellence in Research Management and Leadership.

Catrin Harris
Research Fellow, MI TALENT

Catrin is a Research Fellow for the Midlands Innovation TALENT project, which seeks to raise the status and opportunities for technicians in higher education and research. As part of this role, she has led a project on research culture, exploring technicians’ perspectives of, and experiences in, the research community. She has worked in a research role for 3 years and previously held roles in university administration.

16:15 – 16:30

Close

Jon Hunt
Executive Director, Research & Enterprise, University of Bristol, and Director of Conference Planning, ARMA UK

Jon joined the University of Bristol in February 2019 and is the Executive Director for Research & Enterprise, and Divisional Head for the Research & Enterprise Division (RED). RED helps academics to collaborate and access resources to augment research power, environment and impact – enhancing our national and international reputations and REF success.
Before joining Bristol, Jon has worked for the West of England Combined Authority (WECA), the University of Bath, the Royal Society, as a business analyst in a small company in London, and EPSRC. Before that he was a Chemist, researching liquid crystals.

Jennifer Johnson
Director, Research and Innovation Service, University of Northumbria, and Chair, ARMA UK

Jennifer is Director of Research and Innovation Services at Northumbria University with responsibility for a wide range of research strategy, policy and support services and was the Head of Research Operations and Head of Research Performance and Governance at the University of Leeds for 10 years. Jennifer is committed to the professionalisation and recognition of the research management and administration sector and has sat on the ARMA Board of Directors since 2016. Jennifer was ARMA Director of Training & Development before undertaking a year as Chair Elect and becoming Chair of the Association in August 2020.

Day 3 In-Person (Newcastle)

8:30 – 9:30

Registration, refreshments & exhibition viewing

9:30 – 9:45

Welcome

Jon Hunt
Executive Director, Research & Enterprise, University of Bristol, and Director of Conference Planning, ARMA UK

Jon joined the University of Bristol in February 2019 and is the Executive Director for Research & Enterprise, and Divisional Head for the Research & Enterprise Division (RED). RED helps academics to collaborate and access resources to augment research power, environment and impact – enhancing our national and international reputations and REF success.
Before joining Bristol, Jon has worked for the West of England Combined Authority (WECA), the University of Bath, the Royal Society, as a business analyst in a small company in London, and EPSRC. Before that he was a Chemist, researching liquid crystals.

Jennifer Johnson
Director, Research and Innovation Service, University of Northumbria, and Chair, ARMA UK

Jennifer is Director of Research and Innovation Services at Northumbria University with responsibility for a wide range of research strategy, policy and support services and was the Head of Research Operations and Head of Research Performance and Governance at the University of Leeds for 10 years. Jennifer is committed to the professionalisation and recognition of the research management and administration sector and has sat on the ARMA Board of Directors since 2016. Jennifer was ARMA Director of Training & Development before undertaking a year as Chair Elect and becoming Chair of the Association in August 2020.

9:45 – 10:30

Keynote: Research integrity in the UK: landscape, strategy, and opportunities

The UK Committee on Research Integrity is a new addition to the research integrity landscape. The Committee’s role, as recommended by the House of Commons’ Science and Technology Committee, is to provide leadership for and promotion of research integrity across the UK. The scope includes higher education, public, private and third sector research and across all professions involved in research. The presentation will introduce the work of the Committee and share emerging plans including for strategy and the annual report. The presentation will provide the space and time for comments and questions from attendees.

Rachael Gooberman-Hill
Co-Chair, UKCORI

Professor Rachael Gooberman-Hill is speaking in her capacity as co-chair of the UK Committee on Research Integrity, which she co-chairs with Professor Andrew George. Rachael is social anthropologist by training, leads programmes of interdisciplinary research, and is Director of the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute for Health Research at the University of Bristol. She is also a member of the Development Board of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science and Health, and has held roles on governance bodies of scholarly associations. Throughout her own work Rachael has had keen interest in research integrity, governance, and support for continual improvement.

In partnership with

10:30 – 11:15

Refreshments, networking & exhibition viewing

11:15 – 12:45

How might Research Managers provide a quality research service whilst reducing bureaucracy/ burden and improve research culture and research integrity?

Short insight talks from key stakeholders to inspire table-based discussions and plenary feedback – an opportunity to share your thoughts and reflections.

Liz Ogilvie
Facilitator, The Collective Facilitation

Liz is one of the Founding Directors of The Collective and has over 20 years’ experience in facilitation and leadership development. She has worked for and with organisations from global multinationals, such as Procter and Gamble, to education institutions including Kingston College and micro-enterprises in under-developed parts of London.
Her career has seen her facilitate Sandpits for the UKRI EPSRC BBSRC ESRC and NERC, Wellcome, British Academy and Nuffield and NSF in India, Norway, the US, Canada and New Zealand, as well as in the UK. She has helped many universities and as well as UKRI to inspire innovative, transformative multi-disciplinary solutions to answer increasingly complex scientific challenges and has facilitated many sandpits and consultations with UKRI over the last 12 years.
Liz is a co-author on an e-book on Academic Research Collaboration “Research Collaboration: A Step-by-Step Guide to Success" commissioned by the Institute of Physics which has been published in December 2021.

Caragh Dewis
Facilitator, The Collective Facilitation

Caragh began life as a bio-organic chemist but after completing her PhD, she made the leap into the corporate world, joining Unilever for a number of management and leadership roles. When she realised that she missed being around science, she moved to become Director of Research Services at Cancer Research UK and later joined their internal organisational development team. Since 2012 she has been working as a facilitator and change consultant with clients including The Institute of Cancer Research, British Heart Foundation and Christian Aid.
Caragh has played a key role in the preparation and facilitation of Sandpits for the UKRI EPSRC and BBSRC, Wellcome Trust, British Academy and Nuffield Foundation, and for charities such as Alzheimer's Research UK, Diabetes UK, the Centre for Ageing Better and Autistica.
Caragh is one of the founding Directors of The Collective and has a passionate sideline as an Action Learning Facilitator.

12:45 – 14:15

Lunch, networking & exhibition viewing

14:15 – 15:45

Taking a future view of the research ecosystem - in what ways might this change the role and career pathway of the Research Manager of the future?

Short insight talks from key stakeholders to inspire table-based discussions and plenary feedback – an opportunity to share your thoughts and reflections.

Liz Ogilvie
Facilitator, The Collective Facilitation

Liz is one of the Founding Directors of The Collective and has over 20 years’ experience in facilitation and leadership development. She has worked for and with organisations from global multinationals, such as Procter and Gamble, to education institutions including Kingston College and micro-enterprises in under-developed parts of London.
Her career has seen her facilitate Sandpits for the UKRI EPSRC BBSRC ESRC and NERC, Wellcome, British Academy and Nuffield and NSF in India, Norway, the US, Canada and New Zealand, as well as in the UK. She has helped many universities and as well as UKRI to inspire innovative, transformative multi-disciplinary solutions to answer increasingly complex scientific challenges and has facilitated many sandpits and consultations with UKRI over the last 12 years.
Liz is a co-author on an e-book on Academic Research Collaboration “Research Collaboration: A Step-by-Step Guide to Success" commissioned by the Institute of Physics which has been published in December 2021.

Caragh Dewis
Facilitator, The Collective Facilitation

Caragh began life as a bio-organic chemist but after completing her PhD, she made the leap into the corporate world, joining Unilever for a number of management and leadership roles. When she realised that she missed being around science, she moved to become Director of Research Services at Cancer Research UK and later joined their internal organisational development team. Since 2012 she has been working as a facilitator and change consultant with clients including The Institute of Cancer Research, British Heart Foundation and Christian Aid.
Caragh has played a key role in the preparation and facilitation of Sandpits for the UKRI EPSRC and BBSRC, Wellcome Trust, British Academy and Nuffield Foundation, and for charities such as Alzheimer's Research UK, Diabetes UK, the Centre for Ageing Better and Autistica.
Caragh is one of the founding Directors of The Collective and has a passionate sideline as an Action Learning Facilitator.

15:45 – 16:00

Close of conference

Jon Hunt
Executive Director, Research & Enterprise, University of Bristol, and Director of Conference Planning, ARMA UK

Jon joined the University of Bristol in February 2019 and is the Executive Director for Research & Enterprise, and Divisional Head for the Research & Enterprise Division (RED). RED helps academics to collaborate and access resources to augment research power, environment and impact – enhancing our national and international reputations and REF success.
Before joining Bristol, Jon has worked for the West of England Combined Authority (WECA), the University of Bath, the Royal Society, as a business analyst in a small company in London, and EPSRC. Before that he was a Chemist, researching liquid crystals.

Jennifer Johnson
Director, Research and Innovation Service, University of Northumbria, and Chair, ARMA UK

Jennifer is Director of Research and Innovation Services at Northumbria University with responsibility for a wide range of research strategy, policy and support services and was the Head of Research Operations and Head of Research Performance and Governance at the University of Leeds for 10 years. Jennifer is committed to the professionalisation and recognition of the research management and administration sector and has sat on the ARMA Board of Directors since 2016. Jennifer was ARMA Director of Training & Development before undertaking a year as Chair Elect and becoming Chair of the Association in August 2020.

Following a call for abstracts, posters hang in the virtual poster hall where presenters speak to their posters in a five-minute video that can be played by the viewer at any time. Viewers can also leave comments for the presenter. The poster hall is open throughout days 1 and 2 in the virtual environment and remains open to re-visit for up to 30 days afterwards.

Best poster gets the bragging rights, a £150 amazon voucher and a free delegate place at our next conference!

Poster & Poster Presentations

A Policy Roadmap: From Research to Policy Impact for Upper Limb Prosthetics

Within England, multi-articulated hands are not routinely commissioned on the National Health Service, due to a lack in research evidence. However, these devices could assist people who choose to use them, leading to impact upon their overall quality of life. This poses an opportunity for academic research to generate evidence to support the commissioning of multi-articulated hands. This vision cannot be achieved by one laboratory – a collaborative national approach is required, involving multiple institutions and stakeholders.
This project engaged with a variety of institutions and stakeholders who either use or work with upper limb prosthetic devices from across the United Kingdom and Ireland. In the summer of 2022, the project team will conduct two in-person workshops to identify initial research study designs that could facilitate the gathering of evidence to inform policy.
This poster presentation will illustrate an example of early-stage policy exploration, from initial conception to workshop synthesise, and how this work will pave the way towards facilitating research that aims to inform policy for upper limb prosthetic devices across the United Kingdom, and beyond.

Hannah Jones
Research Project Manager, Newcastle University

Hannah Jones is a Research Project Manager at Newcastle University. Hannah works within the Engineering School, focusing on research projects that are facilitated by multi-stakeholder collaboration. Hannah also holds a Research Associate position at the University of Edinburgh, where she focuses on how co-creation can facilitate research. Prior to working within academia, Hannah worked as an Innovation Manger within an innovation consultancy firm. Hannah graduated with a Masters of Arts Distinction from an Intel Scholarship at Northumbria School of Design in the subject of Industrial Design.

Alix Chadwell
Senior Research Associate, Newcastle University

Alix is a Medical Engineer undertaking research in the field of prosthetics. Her research focusses on understanding how/why people use upper-limb prostheses and where we should focus our efforts to improve these devices for the end user. She combines her research with roles representing the International Society of Prosthetics and Orthotics both in the UK and internationally. She aims to take a holistic view to understand and break down the barriers to larger scale research studies outside of the lab/clinic. She is always looking for new ways to bring this small community of researchers and clinicians closer together.

Building an On-the-Job Training Programme for New Hires

Recruitment trends are challenging with nearly 75% of employers indicating they are planning to hire new staff and 45% highlighting they have hard-to fill vacancies (CIPD Labour Market Outlook, 2022). Many University Research Offices (RO) mirror these challenges of the current labour market. Improving job quality and internal training opportunities is therefore increasingly important to attracting high potential but less experienced employees and ensuring they can provide high-quality professional services.
University of Surrey developed an on-the-job training (OJT) program by identifying critical knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform as a Research Application Officer (RAO). The Fundamentals of Research Applications Support programme was implemented under the management of Senior RAO with the experienced Pre-Award team acting as the primary trainers and evaluators for three new hires. Completion of the six-month OJT programme includes demonstrated KSAs and coincides with the University’s probationary period.
In addition to the positive feedback, the managing Senior RAO received a University of Surrey Value Award for the innovative programme and other RO teams plan to mirror the approach.
The programme details, including lessons learned, are shared so other RO may benefit and build best practices to meet their hiring and training challenges.

Lisa Boyce
Director Research and Innovation Services, University of Surrey
Head Pre-Award/Deputy

Dr Lisa Boyce, currently Head of Research Pre-Award /Deputy Director provides leadership and strategic direction supporting University of Surrey’s ambitious research growth targets. Prior, Lisa served as Research and Business Development Manager at Royal Holloway University of London, where she and her team were responsible for the life cycle of research services from pre-award to technology transfer for three faculties. Previously, Lisa funded and managed multi-million dollars of international life sciences research for the US Government. Lisa is also an experienced researcher with nearly $1m awarded funding and over 40 peer-review publications/presentations, including being a Director of Research.

Karen Dougherty
Senior Research Applications Officer, Research and Innovation Pre-Award, University of Surrey

Mrs Karen Dougherty has performed in both Finance Research Post-Award as a Financial Administrator and Research and Innovation Pre-Award as a Senior Research Application Officer. With over 25 years of service at University of Survey, Karen has a wealth of experience and accolades. Most recently Mrs Dougherty was awarded University of Surrey’s Value Award for exemplifying innovation. Karen was instrumental in developing and implementing an innovative and comprehensive six-month on-the-job training program to ensure academics across the faculties received quality professional support from multiple new Research Application Officers.

Connecting Communities: overcoming language barriers

As research support specialists, Research Managers and Administrators across the UK HEI sector manage application processes and submissions to a wide variety of national and international funders. Despite the use of English as the main communication language and the professional and practical similarities, there are cultural as well as terminology differences between the UK and overseas countries. We may not always communicate correctly or interpret the meaning of funders’ guidance or emails from administrators overseas.
Some terminology examples include; in the UK CI is a co-investigator, whist in Australia CI is the Chief Investigator; in the UK employer contributions to tax and national insurance are ‘on-costs’ whilst in the USA these are 'fringe benefits'.
To help us improve our international communication whilst embracing our differences, this poster will present a quick A-Z comparative glossary of specific terms commonly used in the UK and abroad. This would help in lifting any language barriers whilst communicating with others or interpreting non-British funders' scheme notes. It will also include some useful tips for overcoming obstacles beyond those caused by terminology with the aim of helping UK-based Research Managers and Administrators in navigating non-UK opportunities or partnerships whilst working with overseas counterparts.

Maria Aznarez
Research Grants and Contracts Manager (RGCM), Durham University

Maria has supported research in different capacities over 12 years. She's currently an RGCM in Durham University working alongside an amazing group of peers. This poster is a group effort.

Developing the DAISY Guidance: What makes an effective diversity and inclusion survey question?

This poster and accompanying presentation will cover the Diversity and Inclusion Survey (DAISY) Question Guidance that has been developed by EDIS and Wellcome. The guidance gives recommendations for asking diversity questions, including suggestions for how to ask diversity questions in certain ways and why.
The poster will summarise the contents of the DAISY Guidance, including its guidance for questions on age, disability and long-term health conditions, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, caring responsibilities, religion, and socio-economic background.
The accompanying presentation will contextualise the DAISY Guidance, including a brief overview of its development and progression between its first iteration and the most recent version. The presentation will emphasise the living nature of the guidance and the importance of embedding self-reflection in diversity-related work.
Delegates will benefit from the poster and presentation in multiple ways - they will be prompted to reflect on their own organisation's diversity data monitoring, how and why questions are structured as they are, and how to use the DAISY Guidance to improve their practice. The presentation will prompt delegates to approach diversity-related work through a reflexive lens and model a productive self-critique. https://edisgroup.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/DAISY-guidance-current-upated-May-2022-V2.pdf

Robin Craig
Communications and Administration Officer, DIS Wellcome Trust

Robin Craig is the Communications and Administration Officer for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science and Health (EDIS), hosted by Wellcome. EDIS is a coalition of 29 organisations tackling EDI issues across the science and health sector. His role includes writing articles for the EDIS website, collating the monthly EDIS newsletter, and managing the EDIS Twitter and LinkedIn. Before joining EDIS, Robin was a freelance journalist covering health inequalities and trans rights. He also undertook a PhD on trans and disabled Shakespeare performance.

Evidencing book impacts: an analysis of REF2014 Impact Case Studies and an empirical study

Many researchers produce books, but which publics read these books and what impact do they have? How can a researcher know whether and how their book has connected their research with a community of readers? We will present an analysis of the types of evidence adduced for book impacts in REF2014 Impact Case Studies with the word “book” in the “Summary of impact” field. This sample of 152 was narrowed to 90 non-fiction books for adult readers in the general public. Thematic analysis of these Impact Case Studies produced a schema of 28 different types of impact evidence in six categories. We will also discuss the application of this schema of impact evidence types to an empirical study. The study evaluated the impact of an edited book of non-fiction stories of the professional lives of sixteen rural nurses in New Zealand. An anonymous survey provided valuable direct feedback from readers of the impact of the book on their understanding, attitudes, and practice. We identified other types of evidence of impact from the book, in five of the six categories in the schema. The schema has proven to be an effective tool for the evaluation of impact of researchers’ books.

Lesley Brook
Research Projects Coordinator, Te Pūkenga – New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology

Lesley Brook is Research Projects Coordinator in the Research and Postgraduate Directorate of Otago Polytechnic, a subsidiary of Te Pūkenga – New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology. Her research interest is in achieving and evidencing impact from research. She holds a Master of Professional Practice degree in the evaluation of the emotional impacts of an art exhibition. ORCID # 0000-0001-6678-5179.

Jean Ross
Professor, Te Pūkenga – New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology

Dr Jean Ross is a Professor in the School of Nursing at Otago Polytechnic, a subsidiary of Te Pūkenga – New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology. Her research interests are rural health, rural nursing practice and sustainable community development. She has edited and co-edited three books related to rural health. ORCID # 0000-0003-2467-9233.

How Do UK-Based Funders React in a Global Crisis? The COVID-19 Case Study

Early in the pandemic, research funders recognised the need to coordinate COVID-19 research funding at all levels to prevent duplication and improve impact. In support of this, the COVID CIRCLE has continually mapped and analysed global COVID-19 funding trends through its comprehensive Tracker. The team will present its seven joint funder principles, endorsed by research funders, aligning work towards a coordinated effort for supporting high-quality research in epidemics and pandemics, addressing notions of open science, equitable partnerships, and research capacity. Key findings and recommendations from our ”lessons learnt report” will be shared, reflecting on the challenges and enablers to fulfilling the principles (particularly in Low- and Middle-Income Countries). We will also present UK funding flows, through an in-depth analysis of our Tracker, highlighting the research response timeline and research & innovation priorities.
COVID-19 represents a case study on how research funders respond to a global crisis - with lessons for enhancing the coherence of the research response, defining priority areas and future rapid funding schemes. This will inform the research and the research management community on how to be proactive, responding quickly to funder requirements and ensuring research institutions can be mobilised in a crisis.

Adrian Bucher
Senior Data Analyst (COVID CIRCLE), UK Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR)

Adrian joined UKCDR in 2017 and is the Senior Data Analyst for UKCDR’s COVID CIRCLE initiative - leading on the mapping, analysis, and management of data on the COVID-19 research project tracker. He also leads UKCDR’s funder work on disasters resilience. Adrian brings experience from a variety of positions across the international development sector. As a researcher, Adrian worked on developing models to finance the higher education of women and adolescent girls in Thailand and Cambodia, as well as promoting gender equality in Guatemala. Additionally, Adrian also managed a range of sustainable development projects across Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Nepal.

Daniela Toale
COVID CIRCLE Programme Manager, UK Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR)

Daniela is the Programme Manager for the COVID CIRCLE initiative, which is jointly delivered between UKCDR and GloPID-R. Before this, Daniela was a Research and Policy Officer at UKCDR, seconded from UKRI. Daniela has several years of experience working at UK-based research funders in the international development space and has expertise in research, content management and publishing. She has worked across Europe and has a Research MSc in Global Health from VU Amsterdam, the Netherlands and a BSc in Biomedical Sciences from King’s College London, UK.

Chantel Jones
Research Assistant (COVID CIRCLE), UK Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR)

Chantel is a Research Assistant for COVID CIRCLE, conducting data coding, mapping, and analysis. Chantel’s previous roles have been in research, monitoring and evaluation, and data management. Her research and evaluation work has mostly targeted issues affecting young people, including welfare inequalities, development of children in schools, access to higher education, the impact of outreach initiatives, and the challenge of child stunting. Chantel has managed multiple large datasets and is experienced in analysing, interpreting, and presenting data for a range of stakeholders. Chantel has a BA in Sociology from Durham University and an MSc in Sociology from Oxford University.

Alice Norton
Scientific Manager, Global Research Collaboration for Infectious Disease Preparedness (GloPID-R)

Alice leads the Scientific Secretariat for GloPID-R and is the Research Lead for the COVID CIRCLE initiative. Alice is also a Course Advisor for the International Health and Tropical Medicine Masters course at the University of Oxford. An infectious disease epidemiologist by training, Alice worked as a Programme Manager for the Schistosomiasis Control Initiative in Tanzania, before joining the Wellcome Trust where she worked on global health funding, policy, and developed a global health insight and analysis function. After working as an independent global health policy research consultant, Alice was appointed as the Head of COVID CIRCLE while at UKCDR.

International collaboration in research development processes: Sharing experiences between Morocco and the UK

HEIs and research organisations working in Morocco face a number of challenges around fostering research collaborations nationally and internationally. These include a need for robust systems for developing research, human resources in administration teams and more developed networks for research partnerships. At the same time, UK HEIs often works with global partners to develop and deliver projects but lack knowledge about partners’ processes and systems, which can affect our ability to work in synergy. Enhanced understanding of and shared learning around these processes has the potential to benefit international collaboration, enhancing the capacity of UK and Moroccan HEIs to work together to develop and deliver funded research projects.
This poster reflects on the experience of a collaborative project undertaken by Keele University (UK) and the Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Innovation (Morocco) titled ‘North-South co-learning: Morocco-UK synergies for research capabilities’, funded by the British Council’s Research Environment Links programme. The poster explores the project’s approach, which brings together a hybrid delivery team of researchers and professionals. It describes the challenges encountered, solutions we are working on and benefits we expect the project to bring for both UK and Moroccan collaborators.

Imane El Hamdi
Project Coordinator, Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research, and Innovation (Morocco)

Imane El Hamdi is currently project coordinator at the Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research, and Innovation in Morocco. She has a master’s degree in finance and accounting management in the National School of Trade and Management In Morocco

Gemma Scott
Development Officer, Keele University International Research

Dr Gemma Scott is currently International Research Development Officer at Keele University. She supports the development of research projects and funding applications with international partners and a global remit, particularly those in the global south, and oversees due diligence for international research projects. She holds a PhD from Keele University in Indian history and has previously worked as Impact Development Officer at the University of Birmingham.

Linking research to practice: a reflection on the influence active research has on practitioner roles

I am on a journey to become a more active researcher, and to help develop librarian participation in funded research. I am a member of the Research Catalyst Cohort, the AHRC funded programme organised by ARMA with Research Libraries UK.
I have benefited, and continue to benefit from, the expertise of research managers, and from time allocated to spend on learning and on developing my research interests. I will describe my learning so far, in order to demonstrate the areas where professional practitioners can gain from research and collaboration. I intend to explore the potential links between the practitioner roles of academic subject librarians and research management, discussing librarian knowledge and skills and suggesting areas where librarian expertise can be useful to researchers and research managers.

Alice Cann
Academic Liaison Librarian, Brunel University London

Alice Cann is Academic Liaison Librarian for Business at Brunel University London, where she has worked for 15 years, part time for the past 10 years. This has theoretically been in the same job, but it is one that is continually developing and challenging her in new and exciting ways, recently including issues around the use of systematic reviews in the social sciences. She is currently one of the Research Catalyst Cohort, a new programme from RLUK and ARMA, funded by the ARHC, to develop librarians' involvement in funded research.

Material Transfer Agreements: legal teams smoothing the way for expedient material/sample transfer

Material Transfer Agreements, are they necessary in every case of material/sample transfer? Are they creating a barrier to the progression of research projects? How can we, as contracts managers, legal professionals, research managers and administrators, streamline MTAs? Turnaround times need to improve to enable rapid transfer of samples/materials between academic institutions, research organisations, etc. At the same time we must ensure that regulatory and legislative requirements are satisfied, the rights of the scientist are protected and also mitigate any risks to our employing organisation.
At the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Legal team is developing a plan to partner with the Institute’s scientific programmes with the aim of improving processes which support a proportionate, standardised approach to the review of research contracts. We recognise that the receipt of samples/materials are essential for the research projects our scientists undertake. By creating and implementing a standardised and pragmatic approach to incoming material transfer agreements, the Legal team will be able to expediently support the achievement of the Institute’s scientific objective, which is to advance the understanding of biology and improve health, as well as facilitate collaboration across the sector.

Joanne Brinkman
Senior Contracts Manager, Genome Research Limited operating as the Wellcome Sanger Institute

Joanne started her career in research management and administration in 2000, working through various internal funding and committee secretariat roles in the Research Office at the University of Cape Town, SA. In 2007 she accepted a Pre-Award post at the Research Operations Office at the University of Cambridge and later moved into their Contracts team. Joanne gained substantial experience in drafting, reviewing and negotiating research contracts across various academic disciplines. In 2016 she took up a post in Legal team at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. Joanne is now in the role of Senior Contracts Manager, focussing on contracts standardisation projects.

Researcher Development through an Institute of Advanced Studies

With a common aim of bringing together outstanding researchers from different disciplines, nationalities and academic backgrounds Institutes of Advanced Studies (IASs) play an important role in developing positive research cultures globally. This is evidenced by the establishment of an IAS at Loughborough in 2016, which is now an effective vehicle both for enhancing both our research communities and international connections.
In our poster we will present different mechanisms for enhancing research communities from researcher development opportunities through to bringing international networks together. The IAS gives colleagues an international experience, from our IAS Doctoral Leaders placement scheme through to the leadership of our interdisciplinary annual Themes which welcome international Fellows. Our aim is to demonstrate how an IAS can offer researchers opportunities to develop leadership skills alongside creating tangible institutional benefits and benefiting the research culture and provides an example of good practice. The poster will encourage colleagues to consider ways in which they could offer similar opportunities in their own institutions. We will highlight the skills and experiences that these experiences can develop and will feature individual case studies. We will show how we make opportunities accessible to a diverse range of colleagues.

Laura Dale
Research Development Officer, Loughborough University

Laura Dale is a Research Development Officer at Loughborough University. Her role involves managing Loughborough’s Institute of Advanced Studies programme of activities and events designed to bring the world’s best researchers to Loughborough and Loughborough University London. Laura also manages the IAS programme schedule, including interdisciplinary annual Themes, Spotlight Series, Residential Fellowships and a responsive Open Programme. When not at work she enjoys gardening, reading and cooking.

T&Cs applied: Tracking and Compliance to Modernise Research Management at the Wellcome Sanger Institute

In three years we have transformed our approach to Research Management. We identified a need to modernise our Research Management, seeking a harmonised approach to ensure better compliance and communication, maximising our capacity. Previously, all of our compliance tracking utilised Google Sheets and all communication was sent via emails to individual recipients. This made visibility across our research portfolio difficult and was not conducive to an effective collaborative environment.
We began by utilising a project management tool (Asana) to bring together all of our information from the separate Google Sheets into one centralised location. This tool has evolved into one collaborative workspace, tracking and reporting on everything from grant applications to ethical compliance, engaging management operations teams across the Institute. Standardised, efficient collection of information directly from Researchers has been achieved through leveraging e-forms with this tool.
Our second pivotal change was to create a shared email inbox and alias. This allows us to better monitor our email traffic and has greatly increased productivity and the synergy within our team. Finally, we have recently provided the Researchers with key information and links to our Asana forms via the Institute’s intranet, resulting in all stakeholders aligning with our modernised processes.

Loren Gibson
Research Administrator, Wellcome Sanger Institute

Loren has a real passion for science; she graduated with a degree in Human Genetics and completed her PhD in cell and molecular biology in 2015. Having subsequently worked as a scientist in Industry for 4 years, she made the move into Research Management in 2019 when she joined the Wellcome Sanger Institute as a Research Administrator. She really enjoys working with the faculty to facilitate their research and ensure compliance, and is proud to work with such amazing scientists. She is currently working towards the ARMA Advanced Certificate in Research Management.

Francesca Beaton
Research Administrator, Wellcome Sanger Institutey

Francesca Beaton is a Research Administrator in the Cellular Genetics Programme at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. She joined the Institute in 2020 having previously worked as an academic researcher and obtained a PhD in Stem Cell Biology at the University of Cambridge.

Henry Whiley
Research Administrator, Wellcome Sanger Institute

A Microbiology Master of Research graduate who has progressed from varying laboratory-based roles into research management and technology transfer. Experience has been gained in both commercial and research laboratories, as well as being part of a team that provides the support and services to scientific research from an administrative position, whilst also helping to commercialise arising Intellectual Property as part of large projects. Presently working as a Research Administrator for the Wellcome Sanger Institute and studying for ARMAs Advanced Certificate in Research Management.

Jessica East
Research Administrator, Wellcome Sanger Institute

Jess joined the Sanger Institute 3 years ago after leaving London for Cambridgeshire to start a family. She believes that working at a large research institute, directly supporting the Faculty and helping facilitate the science is incredibly rewarding. Having qualified as a physiotherapist, she always had a strong interest in science and health and found herself switching careers quite accidentally. She has now worked in the charity and higher education sectors for over 15 years, mainly working with medical research charities (The Royal Society, Alzheimer’s Society, Asthma Uk, Stroke Association, Sparks) in grants and research management roles.

The relationship between knowledge exchange activity and research quality

Can Knowledge Exchange activity predict scores in Research Quality, in areas such as impact?
I will be exploring data from the KEF and the recent REF results to look at correlations. Within KEF clusters, I will be identifying correlations between Knowledge Exchange activity metrics and institutional impact and environment scores. Do any KEF metrics predict trends in the REF results? Were overall institutional scores for outputs related to, for example, the co-authorship metric in the Research partnerships perspective? Which of the KEF perspectives correspond closest to REF impact scores in each cluster?
If I'm able to obtain the data, I hope to add a spatial element to the analysis.
I expect to reveal and outline connections between knowledge exchange activity and research quality scores, particularly where focused on impact. I hope to support the case for continued investment in knowledge exchange support.

Rosie Salazar
Knowledge Exchange and Impact Analyst, University of Oxford

Rosie works in the Research Services Innovation and Engagement Team at the University of Oxford. She’s responsible for co-ordinating the University's HE-BCI return, developing a portfolio of case studies for the University's website, and social media communications for impact stories. Rosie was REF Environment and Impact Analyst until recently, part of the central team that delivered Oxford's REF submission. She was responsible for Environment data and supporting impact case study development. Rosie has a background in research, completing a doctorate and a couple of years as a postdoc in Zoology.

ARMA 2022 features a library of content available to view on-demand at any time during days 1 and 2 in the virtual environment, and for 30 days afterwards. In addition to content created following a call for abstracts, the library includes many webinars produced by ARMA’s special interest groups.

On-Demand Webinars

ARMA's EDI journey: delivering a more equitable, diverse and inclusive association for our members

Following the publication of our first EDI policy in 2020, ARMA has been on a journey to identify and remove barriers and drive more equitable outcomes in all of our activities. We want to talk about how we have approached building a more equitable, diverse and inclusive association for our members. Our presentation will be divided into four sections:

  • Changing how we lead – embedding EDI into our board and governance training to enable authentic and inclusive leadership
  • Changing how we recruit – our new inclusive recruitment policy seeks to ensure positions within ARMA are open and accessible to all
  • Changing how we evaluate – using EDI data collection to evaluate our performance and progress and openly inviting feedback to ensure continuous improvement
  • Changing how we engage – ensuring the events and engagement activities are inclusive and support our members in their own EDI journeys.
Sapna Marwaha
Director, Formation Consultancy, Director, ARMA UK, and Board Member, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Science and Health

Sapna is a qualified solicitor with extensive experience of advising HEI’s and research funders on the legal implications of research and innovation activities including commercial contracts, intellectual property and governance. She began her career in research management in the research contracts team at the University of Glasgow. She progressed to leading a team of legal and contracts staff to support the research agenda as Head of Research Contracts at the University of Nottingham. She then became a legal advisor in medical research charities, Versus Arthritis and LifeArc, before establishing herself as an independent consultant and non-executive director.

Lorna Wilson
Co-Director, Research and Innovation Services, University of Durham, and Director, ARMA UK

Lorna is Co-Director of Research and Innovation Services at Durham University. She has extensive experience of supporting successful external funding applications, including for large scale interdisciplinary proposals such as Creative Fuse North East and the Urban Living Partnership. She has successfully supported colleagues with applications to a diverse portfolio of funders including ESRC, AHRC, NERC, EPSRC, the Wellcome Trust and the Newton Fund (for example).

A simple act of kindness; positive actions for inclusive professional development

We have been asking ourselves a question, perhaps you have been too. As a Funding Development team, we’re in the business of giving advice. Empathy is key as we guide, coach and embolden our researcher community. We are their advocates, helping them to find their place in an ever-changing funding landscape, championing growth of their skills, expertise and career progression. We listen, really listen. But do we promote that same philosophy to support our own research manager and administrator (RMA) colleagues and the wider profession?
The ARMA Survey on Research Culture 2020 offered us a collective voice, and our community narrative told of the challenges experienced around access to promotion and progression opportunities, career prospects, and recognition of diverse career pathways. To encourage wider discussions, we will explore these topics by reflecting on our own team practices and insights gained from other universities. With compassion and humility, we will celebrate the good bits and recognise the shortcomings. The Researcher Development Concordat will provide the framework, furthering our quest for parity of esteem within the research ecosystem, inspiring shifts in understanding leading us to practical solutions and helping to answer our own question; are we truly practicing what we preach?

Jaydene Witchell
Research Funding Manager, University of Southampton

Jaydene is a Research Funding Manager within Research and Innovation Services at the University of Southampton. She leads on the University's funder relations with BBSRC and Wellcome Trust, providing secretariat support to the Community of Practice, managing the University's activities as a BBSRC Additional Strategic Partner and undertaking associated research bid project management support. Jaydene joined Southampton in September 2021, building upon more than fifteen years previous experience working within academia and research funding, including a period of ten years at the Wellcome Trust following her PhD, managing a number of Wellcome's expert panels and strategic planning across funding schemes.

Frances Demuth
Research Funding Coordinator, University of Southampton

Frances is the Research Funding Coordinator within the Research Funding Development team at the University of Southampton. Frances is new to research administration, having joined the team in October 2021. Frances previously worked on the UKRI-funded national STEM Ambassador programme for Central South England at Winchester Science Centre for five years. The programme supports STEM researchers and industry professionals to undertake outreach work in formal and informal learning environments with young people to inspire the next generation in to STEM.

Stephen Abolins
Research Funding Officer, University of Southampton

Steve joined the University of Southampton’s Research Funding Development team as a Research Funding Officer where a large part of his role is to assist researchers (especially early career researchers) with identifying and applying for funding opportunities. Steve previously worked for the NIHR, writing commissioning briefs, identifying priority topics, and organising panel meetings. Prior to this, Steve worked as a researcher for over thirteen years, in both academia and industry.

Mylène Ployaert
Head of Research Funding Development, University of Southampton

With a career of over 25 years at the interface between academia and external partners, Mylène has extensive experience in research management and commercialisation. As Head of Research Funding Development in Research and Innovation Services (RIS), her role is to support and facilitate the growth and development of research at the University of Southampton. She provides leadership and direction for a team of research support professionals with expertise in the UK and international funding landscape. Working in partnership with researchers, funders and Schools, the team actively supports researchers in identifying, applying for and securing external funding.

Better research culture - some thoughts on the role of Research Development Managers

This on-demand webinar will cover the following issues related to the role of Research Development Managers (and colleagues in similar roles) in supporting and nurturing a more positive research culture.

  • How Research Managers can help improve research culture
  • Some thoughts on our own practices and policies
  • Positively influencing others
  • Writing ‘Research Culture’ in Grant Applications
  • What’s on the horizon?

This is a revised and updated version of a similar presentation delivered part of an ARMA virtual event on 'Supporting Research Culture through Research (Funding) Development', held on Sept 27th 2021.

Adam Golberg
Research Development Manager (Charities), University of Nottingham

Adam Forristal Golberg is Research Development Manager (Charities) at the University of Nottingham. Adam has over fifteen years' experience in research development at Nottingham and Keele. Adam is a former ARMA Champion for the Research Development special interest group (SIG). Adam writes occasional articles for Research Professional and for his own blog at socialscienceresearchfunding.co.uk He tweets @cash4questions

Funder Compliance Won’t Wait! Embracing and Driving Cultural Change

Following a UKRI audit and the result being limited assurance, it became a priority to make changes in order to improve compliance. Various schemes were introduced including “One Teams”. Within our Post Award unit, we had our own action and goals that included producing materials and facilitating training. Through this, we’d be working on improving the quality and service being proved with enhance visibility, creating a structured process, providing training, being a driver of cultural change that would positively impact on operations.
We plan to share our journey to our Service Level Agreement (SLA). It will show how having clarity of direction and how our process of collaboration and knowledge sharing enabled us to clearly express who we are and what we do.
The delegates will be taken on the journey of where we were, what we did, how we did it and what we have as a result the end. It could create a template or point on how to go about having conversations within their teams from professional services to researcher or departments they work in.

Cherice Walford
Senior Research Grants Administrator, King's College London

Cherice is currently a Senior Research Grants Administrator at King’s college London. She works in the Post Award Unit of the Research Management and Innovation Directorate where she supports a range of faculties including Cardiovascular, Psychology and Age-Related Diseases while relating with a variety of funders. Before joining King’s, Cherice worked in a variety of sectors with a significant amount of time being in the media space. Cherice enjoys ready and spending quality time with those closest to her.

Richard Obace
Senior Research Grants Administrator, King's College London

Richard is currently a Senior Research Grants Administrator at King’s college London. He works in the Post Award Unit of the Research Management and Innovation Directorate where he supports a range of faculties including Nursing, Natural Sciences and Mathematics with a variety of funders. His work revolves around external debt management, financial reporting, and related queries. Before coming to King’s, he previously worked for a UK based International Non-Governmental Organisation who have presence in several developing countries across several continents. His personal hobbies include sports and travel.

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

King’s Post-Award (PA) team and the School of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine & Sciences (SCMMS) have improved their working relationship by implementing internal and external kick-off and pop-up meetings. These face-to-face meetings are set up for new Researchers starting within the school, ongoing research projects but also between all stakeholders for newly funded clinical trials.
COVID 19 changed the way we worked and like other organisations, we went with the time. With easier access to everyone online things were getting quite chaotic. Post Lockdown we have intentionally gone after building stronger working relationships. Before these meetings, research staff and PA were not introduced to each other until it was required by grant work, and this was a reactive process. A similar situation for clinical trials where there are often many stakeholders involved and information gets lost in translation.
Introducing these kick-off meetings, as well as robust grant reviews with researchers, including a trial start-up checklist, has improved the workflow, but most of all the understanding of each other’s work.

Cherice Walford
Senior Research Grants Administrator, King's College London

Cherice is currently a Senior Research Grants Administrator at King’s College London. She works in the Post Award Unit of the Research Management and Innovation Directorate where she supports a range of faculties including Cardiovascular, Psychology and Age-Related Diseases while relating with a variety of funders. Before joining King’s, Cherice worked in a variety of sectors with a significant amount of time being in the media space. Cherice enjoys ready and spending quality time with those closest to her.

Vicky Aerts
School Research Manager - School of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine & Sciences (SCMMS), King's College London

Since January 2022 Vicky is the School Research Manager at the School of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine and Sciences at King’s College London. Before this role she was the Operations Officer Education where she was supporting the PGR students at this school. Before moving to the UK Vicky did her PhD in Bushfire Ecology at the University of Sydney and worked for the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Putting people before technology: how communities build better research infrastructure

When we think of research infrastructure, we may think of computer hardware, cloud storage, high speed digital networks, wi-fi, data analysis software or research information systems. However, effective infrastructure for research and research management, also requires institutions, services, standards, workflows and people.
Technological solutions that fit the needs of users require early and frequent contribution from stakeholder communities who help focus priorities and share knowledge. This session will look at the ‘non-digital’ aspects of building infrastructure for research and research management.
We will look at 3 examples of newly formed national and international communities that seek to influence the development and sustainability of digital research infrastructure.
Developing an international approach to the adoption of Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) for research.
Building an intersectional community of practice around the capture, sharing and preservation of practice research outputs, through engagement with researchers, practitioners and those who enable/support infrastructure.
New approaches to management and sharing of research facilities and assets - the role of sector stakeholders in identifying opportunities and challenges
We will also discuss a number of other current and planned projects, followed by a discussion around the role that research managers can play in this area.

Tamsin Burland
Head of Product, Jisc

Tamsin began her career in research, where she worked for 10 years. She subsequently worked as research manager for 13 years, at a variety of institutions. She joined Jisc in 2015 as a subject specialist for Research and now heads up a product team within Jisc’s Open Research Services group. The work of her team focuses on research management infrastructure, and provides products, services and development work in this area, including the UK ORCID consortium, the Publications Router service and support for persistent identifier community work.

Jenny Evans
Research Environment and Scholarly Communications Lead, University of Westminster

Jenny Evans is Research Environment and Scholarly Communications Lead at the University of Westminster. She is responsible for open research, research integrity and ethics, researcher development, research management systems, and leads a team of subject matter experts. Jenny (PI on the AHRC funded PRVoices scoping project) led a team of repository staff and researchers, in collaboration with software developers, to develop a state of the art open-source repository (Haplo now Cayuse) to capture all research including practice research. She continues to advocate on behalf of this community, to raise awareness of the challenges, and to improve systems and metadata standards.

Chris Brown
Product Manager, Jisc

Christopher Brown is a product manager at Jisc where he leads on persistent identifier (PID) projects and manages the UK ORCID Consortium. He also supports a number of projects, activities and community groups around research notebooks, research data, research information, research analytics, open research, standards development, and other work that supports Jisc’s research strategy and services. He engages with international groups and projects, including the Research Data Alliance (where he manages the RDA UK node), to ensure Jisc is positioned correctly with national and international developments. He currently co-chairs the RDA’s National PID Strategies working group.

Victoria Moody
Director of research and innovation sector strategy, Jisc

Victoria Moody is Director of research and innovation sector strategy at Jisc, focusing on the corporate development and implementation of Jisc’s Research and innovation sector strategy through engagement in the UK and internationally. Victoria has a track-record in research, research collaboration and research leadership. She is Co-investigator and Deputy Director of the UK Data Service, a multi-partner digital research data infrastructure project. With experience of research assessment for REF 2014, researcher development and institutional research data management, she has also worked at the Information Commissioner’s Office, the Charity Commission, in local government and in the national museums sector.

Research culture through COVID and restructuring

A positive research culture is the starting point for everything we do but it has been challenging to sustain this recently. COVID meant less time and space for research, fewer opportunities to meet and collaborate, and rapid adjustments to research methodologies. At Kent, a restructure during 2020 resulted in the creation of Divisions, bringing Schools together under a new Professional Services structure. This session explores what has worked well (and not so well!) in rebuilding a positive research culture and environment after the disruption of the last two years.

Kate Ludlow
Research and Innovation Manager, University of Kent

Kate is Research and Innovation Manager in the Division of Law, Society and Social Justice at the University of Kent. She is responsible for delivering the Division's strategic priorities: culture, quality, income, impact and EDI. She joined the Research Contracts team at Kent in 2012, then moved to the Centre for Health Services Studies as Administration Manager in 2016.

Should systems drive processes or processes affect systems? KCL and Durham’s experience.

Kasia Haremza, with her KCL experience and Pre-Award expertise and Leila Cole with her Durham and KCL experience and Post Award expertise, share how the universities expanded and adapted its use of Worktribe to further streamline research management and how it affected their processes.
The two Universities are very different, yet both chose the same research management system, and both took on a different approach with regards to the planning stage, order in which each module was launched, process mapping, design, preparation and training. We wish to talk about how funders and their systems impacted our journey and processes. Share lessons learned based on the successful launch of a system as well as previous failures with different systems. How the system affected our processes and how the processes continue to impact the system and our attempts to improve it following requirements and processes that cannot or should not be changed. Having worked with new system that was not fit for purpose, we understand the importance of a good system and appropriate approach to launch it.

Kasia Haremza
Pre Award Lead – Health Faculties, Deputy Director of Research Grants, King's College London

Deputy Director of Research Grants leads the team of Pre-Award supporting Health Faculties at King’s College London. Having worked within research administration for 14 years she supported full research life cycle from costing an application, contract negotiation with funders and collaborators, to financial reporting to a number of national and international funders. She has been key member of the team involved in launch of Worktribe system within KCL and represented Pre-Award throughout the process. Involved in initial planning, design, preparation of training materials and training plan, she continues her involvement within Post Award module and further business planning.

Leila Cole
Senior Research Finance Compliance Manager, Durham University

Senior Research Finance Compliance Manager leads the Post Award team within Durham University, having joined in 2017 from KCL. Having worked within Research Finance for 15 years she specialises in Post Award Management, Financial Reporting and Audits at a national and international level. She has been a key member of the Durham Worktribe implementation team representing Post-Award throughout and leading on the Post Award module design, preparation and launch. Currently continuing this on the Finance System upgrade working group, leading on ORACLE Projects for Post Award and integrations with Worktribe.

The ARMA mentoring scheme: Supporting Research Managers and Administrators across the UK

ARMA’s mentoring scheme enables members from across our RMA community, irrespective of role or seniority, to either volunteer to be a mentor or seek support as a mentee for a specific work-based challenge. The scheme is in its 4th year and was an early adopter of online meetings, ensuring connectivity for participants across the UK.
This webinar provides an overview of the scheme, giving examples of how it has supported RMAs, particularly through recent challenging times. It will draw on the experiences of the working group, mentors and mentees about the value of external mentoring through ARMA. A running theme throughout the 2021/22 cohort is that working through a pandemic has been hard, and the transition to life “after COVID” still presents many pressures on members.
To aid mentors after a mentee has made an emotional disclosure, the working group has created a toolkit of resources for those who may be struggling with mental health and wellbeing issues. These issues may be beyond the scope of a mentoring relationship and this extra support signposts to points of contact and suggests productive steps forward.
Viewers will gain insight into the scheme and are encouraged to get involved in future years.

Charlotte Brady
Strategic Research Executive, The University of Edinburgh

Dr Charlotte Brady is a Strategic Research Executive at the University of Edinburgh. With expertise in Higher Education policy, research and innovation policy and strategy, university strategy, and research impact, she delivers projects across the spectrum of research activities. Previously she was the Project Manager for the University of Edinburgh's REF 2021 submission. With a PhD in chemistry, she has a background of working for both the commercialisation arm of the University, and has worked for the Vice-Principal for Research. She joined the ARMA mentoring working group in the summer of 2021, and has been a mentor in two cohorts.

Kirsty Withers
Senior Research Development Manager, University of Reading

Dr Kirsty Withers is a Senior Research Development Manager at the University of Reading. She has experience of providing pre-award support for development of research grant applications across a range of funders, costing grant proposals and developing processes and procedures. Kirsty has worked in Research Management for 10 years prior to that working in Drug Discovery and as an academic. She is a member of the ARMA Conference Working Group and joined the Mentoring Working Group in Summer 2021. She has been a mentor in two cohorts of the scheme which has been a very rewarding experience.

Tania Cleaves
Research Facilitator, University of Birmingham

Dr Tania Cleaves is a Research Facilitator (2016-Present, University of Birmingham), covering pre-award bid development and grants training in the Social Sciences and Humanities. The latter is her current home and comfort zone, given her Art History background. After finishing her PhD (2004-2008, Nottingham), Cleaves held postdoctoral fellowships funded by SSHRC (2010-2012, McGill) and the Wellcome Trust (2012-2016, Warwick). Beyond her full-time role and active engagement and membership with ARMA, she remains an 'alt ac' (alternative academic), pursuing research in her spare time with funding from the Paul Mellon Centre and alongside caring responsibilities.

Sue Starbuck
Interim Director of Research and Innovation, Royal Holloway

Sue has been supporting research since 1998 and is currently Interim Director of Research and Innovation at Royal Holloway. She is particularly interested in promoting a good research culture through positive processes and interactions, in working strategically with academic colleagues, in the facilitation of cross disciplinary collaboration and in developing researchers and research support staff. She has had considerable experience of designing and running research-related training and of presenting on various aspects of research support. She is a co-author (with Julie Reeves and Alison Yeung) of “Inspiring Collaboration and Engagement”, part of the Sage “Success in Research” series.

UKCDR: accelerating global development through the power of research and knowledge

The UK Collaborative on Development Research is a generator and repository of knowledge and good practice to enable and support the development of a transdisciplinary research ecosystem for international development research. Through this session, we will discuss UKCDR’s vision and we will explore a range of resources developed by UKCDR and available to the research and the research management community to support the development of research proposals aimed at addressing transnational challenges and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
Following the launch of its new 3-year strategy, UKCDR has identified the academic and research management communities, nationally and internationally, as stakeholders we want to further engage with to achieve our overall vision to accelerate global development through the power of research and knowledge. Over the years, UKCDR has produced a range of best practice documents and data analysis that could be highly valuable to inform and maintain a coordinated approach to research.
We hope this session will allow to foster dialogue, draw on complementary skills, initiate discussions and ensure we can work alongside the research management community to ensure representation and understanding of needs and priorities to jointly address global challenges.

Maggy Heintz
Executive Director, UKCDR - UK Collaborative on Development Research

Maggy leads UKCDR, providing high-level engagement and strategic coordination of the SCOR Board. Prior to UKCDR, Maggy was at the University of Leicester for 8 years. Most recently Head of Research and Business Development, she was International Research Development Manager for several years working with partners in LMICs. She facilitated and coordinated large-scale multidisciplinary research proposals addressing the UN SDGs. Prior to this position, she was science attaché in physical sciences and innovation (French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, London), and has a research background in Earth Sciences, having conducted research at the Australian National University and the University of Cambridge.

Special Interest Group On-Demand Webinars

Special Interest Group On-Demand Webinars

Arts & Humanities Special Interest Group

A discussion of the new types of funding emerging from the AHRC, how we, as research support staff, have mobilised to support our colleagues with these schemes and a reflection on the early outputs of the projects.

Eleanor Glenton
Interim Deputy Head of Research Development, Durham University

Eleanor Glenton is the Interim Deputy Head of Research Development at Durham University.
She is also supporting the Faculty of Arts and Humanities with all things research development. Prior to this she was the Research Grants and Contracts Officer for the faculty and for departments in both the Science and Social Sciences faculties. This varied experience has given her a real insight into the challenges and rewards of working across interdisciplinary boundaries.
Eleanor joined the university in 2003 having previously worked in research grant finance. This ‘inception to completion’ career path has given her an excellent breadth of understanding of the research funding landscape.

Christie Walker
Head of Research Development, Royal College of Art

Christie Walker is the Head of Research Development at the Royal College of Art.
She and her team support the breadth of pre- to post-award research, including proposal development, post-award management, ethics and research integrity, open research and the RCA Research Repository, research policy, researcher development, reporting, and not least of which, the RCA's REF submission.
Christie joined the RCA in 2015, and prior to this, she was a Strategy Development Manager for the Arts & Humanities Research Council and then a Research Base Liaison Manager at InnovateUK. Christie's time at the AHRC and now at the RCA have helped her develop a particular interest in working with and supporting practice research.

Audit & Compliance Special Interest Group

As research administrators and managers, we've all noticed the ever-increasing scrutiny from funders.
Over the past years assurance requirements have spiralled, not just from specialist funding streams, but also from core sources.
This session, delivered by the Audit and Compliance Special Interest Group aims to focus on the growing number of sponsors requiring assurance, and the varying forms it takes.
We will detail key changes in funders terms over the past year. We will then look towards the future and horizon scan on what's in the pipeline for assurance in future years.

Charles Shannon
Head of Research Management, Ulster University

Charles Shannon is considered a leading expert for research funding assurance and compliance in the UK.
He specialises in funder audits, compliance, assurance, risk management and due diligence. He supports funded organisations ensuring they have the necessary systems, policies, procedures, governance and strategies to adhere to the funder's terms, conditions and policy statements. He has worked with, coordinated and project managed a variety of funder audits or assurance visits.
He currently heads Research Management at Ulster University, leading post-award and contracts.
Charles consults with various Funding Organisations about their policies, procedures or assurance requirements

Ellen Thompson
Senior Grant Audit Manager, LEES Chartered Certified Accountants

Ellen is specialising in the audit of UK, European and US federal auditing across Europe and further afield. An alumni of the University of Stirling (Scotland) and University of Massachusetts - Amherst, she has worked in both the UK and US, and now resides in Norwich, UK, where she runs the LEES dedicated grant audit team, alongside Jonathan Gray. She regularly presents at international conferences on the nuances of grant auditing and is the former European co-editor of the NCURA magazine, the US-version of ARMA. She co-chairs the ARMA SIG on Audit & Compliance with Charles Shannon.

EU & International Special Interest Group

The webinar will focus on a case study whereby a University had to terminate a very prestigious International Fellowship due to the various legal , financial and HR issues that arose as a result .
It will be a 10 minute webinar and will aim to apprise the attendees of the several issues that emanate from such Fellowships and the risks that need to be managed.
Whilst various Universities have different risk appetites , the webinar aims to acquaint the attendees to the costs, risks and possible mitigation strategies that need to be thought about at the pre- award stage.

Bikram Singh
Head of Research Finance & Compliance, Coventry University.

Bikram Singh is the Head of Research Finance & Compliance at Coventry University. Previous to this job , he was working within Project management within University of Leicester and University of Birmingham.
He is a qualified accountant with a Masters in International Law. He is currently a Doctoral researcher within the Business School in Coventry researching on the ‘Performance and Sustainability of Strategic Business Units (Research Centres) within Universities’.
He is an active member of ARMA for a no. of years and is the champion for the International SIG.

Open Research Special Interest Group

This short webinar outlines the work of the ARMA Open Research special interest group and introduces newcomers to the core topics within this wide-ranging subject as well as giving examples from our own experiences. It will also offer a tester of what we have planned for our drop-in session.

Valerie McCutcheon
Research Information Manager, University of Glasgow

Valerie represents ARMA on the Open Research Competencies Coalition and Jisc Open Research Advisory Board. She is a founder and Editorial Advisory Board member for the Open Access Books Toolkit. She is a contributor to, and Editorial Board member for, the How to be FAIR with your data (uni-goettingen.de) book.
She has a lead role in open research at the University of Glasgow. Previously she led developments to the University of Glasgow Research System and fostered linkage of the repository to core systems.
Her work history includes managing information for land and seismic surveys, oil wells, clinical trials, and software houses.

Kirsty Wallis
Head of Research Liaison, University College London (UCL)

Kirsty currently manages Research Support and Open Science activity at UCL in her role leading the day-to-day activity of the UCL Office for Open Science & Scholarship. She represents the UK in the Knowledge Exchange Open Science Expert Group and is about to commence her PhD in the UCL Department of Information Studies.
Kirsty is a member of two EU funded Citizen Science projects as well as a member of the European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) Working Group for Citizen Science in Universities. She is also a section editor for an upcoming LIBER book, Citizen Science for Research Libraries – A Guide

Research Development SIG: Research Development, Innovation and Business Engagement: three sides of the same coin?

This webinar covers how research support mechanisms in the UK HEI context are developing to connect research development to innovation and business engagement. Increasingly research and business development services in universities are collaborating through formal structures or interlocking roles that help build partnerships. Research and innovation funders are more and more interested in research driving a reduction of social vulnerabilities that will be applicable and sustainable in real settings. These real-world problems require co-created innovations; and entrepreneurs and businesses are increasingly working with academia to find solutions. Realising the “innovation” potential of a research idea and the need for business engagement at an early stage of research conceptualisation is a key ingredient of the research support lifecycle. This creates a need to recognise the slight spill-over developing in research development professionals’ work into the innovation support and business engagement spheres - considering that all may start with the same research question. In this webinar, I will share selected insights and case studies from research development professionals and UK universities to discuss whether/how this connection works.

Dr Aygen Kurt-Dickson
Research and Innovation Strategy Manager, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and ARMA SIG Research Development Champion

Aygen has a strong interest and background in research and innovation policy. She has developed multiple aptitudes in her career over the last decade in-between academic and administrative facets of higher education. In addition to her R&I role, she also works as Policy Fellow at LSE’s International Inequalities Institute. Aygen focuses on strategy development in research and knowledge exchange funding; and connecting social science-based research to innovation for impactful outcomes. She is an expert facilitator for interdisciplinary and collaborative research projects; an independent grant evaluator for European Commission grants; and an expert on research funding policy from an HEI perspective.

Research Evaluation SIG: The Metric Tide Revisited

The three main authors of the Metric Tide Revisited report will discuss their approach to the review and findings from the stakeholder roundtable events. The panel includes:

  • Stephen Curry: Professor of Structural Biology and Assistant Provost for equality, diversity and inclusion at Imperial College London, and Chair of the Declaration on Research Assessment steering committee. He was a steering group member and co-author of ‘The Metric Tide’ in 2015.
  • Dr Elizabeth Gadd: Research Policy Manager, Loughborough University and Chair of the International Network of Research Management Societies, Research Evaluation Group
  • James Wilsdon: Digital Science Professor of Research Policy at the University of Sheffield and Director of the Research on Research Institute. He was the review Chair and co-author of ‘The Metric Tide’ in 2015 and is a founding member of the Forum for Responsible Research Metrics (FRRM).
Elizabeth Gadd
Research Policy Manager, Loughborough University, and Co-champion, Research Evaluation SIG

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Gadd is Research Policy Manager at Loughborough University. She chairs the INORMS Research Evaluation Working Group and the ARMA Research Evaluation SIG. She founded the LIS-Bibliometrics Forum and The Bibliomagician Blog and was the recipient of the 2020 INORMS Award for Excellence in Research Management and Leadership.

Matt McCallum
Associate Director of Programmes, AHRC, and Co-champion, Research Evaluation SIG

Matt is Associate Director of Programmes at the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) which is part of UK Research and Innovation. He oversees the design and delivery of funding opportunities for the arts and humanities research communities. He is a Director of the Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA) and chairs the Member Engagement Committee.

Research Excellence Framework (REF) Special Interest Group

This on demand session from the REF SIG will include a conversation between Anna Grey the SIG Champion and Catriona Firth, the Associate Director for Research Environment at Research England and the lead policy maker for the Future Research Assessment Plan. It is expected that discussions will cover the latest information on FRAP, findings from the recent consultation and what lessons can be learnt from the recent REF 2022 exercise

Anna Grey
Director of Research Office, Edge Hill University

Anna Grey is Director of Research Office at Edge Hill University. Her previous role was Research Strategy and Policy Manager, including stints as the Deputy Head of Research Services at the University of York. She is the Champion of the ARMA REF SIG and was seconded to Research England as a Panel Adviser for REF 2021, supporting panels with the criteria setting and assessment phases across Main Panels A.

Dr Catriona Firth
Associate Director, Research Environment at Research England

Catriona is providing strategic leadership of Research England’s portfolio of policy work aimed at ensuring an effective environment for research within English universities. This includes policies relating to: responsible research assessment (including the Future Research Assessment Programme), research careers, equality, diversity and inclusion, open research, and research integrity.
Catriona previously worked in the REF 2021 team as Head of REF Policy. Prior to joining Research England, she worked in a number of UK universities in academic and research professional roles.

Research Impact SIG: all you wanted to know about being an impact professional but were too scared to ask

Impact is a growing sector within research management – are you tempted to try it or are you recently in post? Here, the three Impact SIG champions will share what it’s really like to be an impact professional: what they find most enjoyable, most challenging and most surprising. Hear about a “day in the life of” and maybe even some top tips!

Dr Pauline Addis
Research Impact Officer, Newcastle University

Pauline began her impact career in 2011 by writing up case studies for the 2014 REF. Over 11 years, this role expanded and now includes training, developing strategic partnerships and contributing to national consultations.

Alisha Peart
Research Impact Manger, Northumbria University

Alisha jointly led the transformative change in the research impact culture at Northumbria University, culminating in the outstanding success for Northumbria in the 2021 Research Excellence Framework Assessment. Alisha is also the Impact Special Interest Group Co-Lead for the Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA). She has presented and delivered training at national/international conferences and workshops.

Lucy Jowett
Research Impact Manger, Northumbria University

Lucy’s expertise, enthusiasm and commitment to impact-rich research culture contributed to an outstanding result for Northumbria in the 2021 research assessment. She contributes thought leadership and supports networking and training on research impact nationally and internationally.

Routes to Publication for Research into Research Management and Administration

This short webinar will explore the ways in which RMA professionals can publish and disseminate their research findings. It will examine the different types of Research into RMA and suggest a variety of suitable publication formats to ensure that RMA work has maximum visibility and impact. This webinar will be relevant to all career stages, whether you are just curious as to what Research into RMA is or have a significant track-record of undertaking RMA related research projects.

Dr Christopher Daley
Research Development Manager (Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences), Royal Holloway, University of London

Christopher has over ten years’ experience working in both academic and professional services positions within higher education. He holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Westminster and originally worked in academia before moving into research support roles, initially within scholarly communications and more recently in posts focused on research development and research strategy. He is also the founder and Co-Director of the Engaged Humanities Lab at Royal Holloway which aims to create diverse partnerships between academia, the cultural sector and local community organisations as well as promote the societal value of arts and humanities research.

Alicen Nickson
Director, Research and Innovation
Cranfield University

A highly motivated leader and specialist research and innovation manager, Alicen is Director, Research and Innovation at Cranfield University. Previously at Royal Holloway, Alicen has extensive experience of research life-cycle management at operational and strategic levels, she delivers wide ranging initiatives by working in partnership with colleagues at all levels. Alicen strives to deliver excellence and to provide an enabling environment in which her staff can excel and in which collaborations can grow and thrive. With a passion for continuous improvement, she drives research agendas to explore ‘what works’ in research management, to both impact the international research management community and underpin her own professional practice.